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Swish Fly Turnout Combination rug: first look


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  • Swish Waterproof Fly Combo Turnout

    Score

    8/10
    • Style:
      8/10
    • Fit:
      7/10
    • Ease of use:
      10/10

    Pros

    • The detachable neck cover is included in the price
    • 1200D ripstop waterproof panel
    • Detachable leg straps

    Cons

    • A bit big on the body for my 15.2hh horse
    • More suited to narrower types at the chest

    Manufacturer:

    Swish Equestrian

    Price as reviewed:

    £89.99

    Swish Waterproof Fly Rug

    My first impressions of the Swish Fly Turnout Combination rug were very good – it certainly stands out with its vibrant orange waterproof panel along the back and when taking it out of the reusable bag, I noted it felt sturdy and well made.

    I haven’t previously used any Swish products so I was very interested to try this. One of the first positives to report is the waterproof panel is 1200D ripstop fabric, which will be very beneficial in during summer rain spells – and it is worth noting this is double the 600D that the DefenceX System Airflow detachable fly rug offers.

    I like that this waterproof fly rug comes with a detachable neck cover, which is included in the £89.99 price. The neck cover features double-locking Velcro fastenings that I felt really provided extra security – it doesn’t feel like it would easily come open.

    Both my horses, a 15.2hh Connemara x ISH and a 16hh Connemara x ISH, take a 6ft3in rug in different brands. Interestingly this 6ft3in Swish waterproof fly rug was slightly on the large side in the body for my 15.2hh mare – who normally takes a 6ft3 in Amigo – but was also a little bit narrow at the chest, so I’ll be checking to make sure this doesn’t rub with continued use. It fit my bigger horse – who fits a 6ft3in  Weatherbeeta nicely – very well in the body, but was too tight on the chest. Overall I would say this is suited to narrower types in front.

    The rug offers lots of other features including a large tail flap, a fleece-lined wither pad for comfort, a plastic-covered fillet string, detachable leg straps and the bottom half of the rug is made from a breathable nylon aimed at keeping your horse cool. This rug also has safety reflective strips on the front, side and tail flap which is a feature I haven’t seen in many fly rugs previously, so this is a nice added touch.

    Verdict

    Initial thoughts – I really like this rug and think it is going to be long-lasting and be a really beneficial part of my horses’ summer wardrobe. It comes with lots of features that I would usually expect to see on more typically expensive brands, such as Weatherbeeta or Premier Equine, so for the price I think this is very reasonable.

    View now at amazon.co.uk


    What is a first look review?

    These are our first impressions of a piece of kit or clothing based on spending some time with it. We will have had our hands on it and given it a really thorough going over before trying it on ourselves or our horses and using it. The information we can give you after this first look will give you some sense of what it’s like to use, even if it’s only an initial view. As soon as we’ve given it a more thorough test, we will update the review with a full scoring and additional thoughts.

    Find out more about how Horse & Hound tests products

    Who tested this fly rug?

    Becky Murray started freelance writing for Horse & Hound in 2016 alongside other equestrian titles, before joining the H&H news team in July 2018. She was made senior news writer in January 2022. During her time at H&H she has reported on a broad range of topics across the equestrian industry including welfare issues, veterinary studies, FEI Tribunal hearings, rider safety, and road safety campaigns. In 2019 she attended the national Strangles Symposium and the Scottish welfare conference.

    Becky was part of the home remote reporting team for the Tokyo Olympic Games and the European Showjumping Championships and has reported from Morris Equestrian, the Royal Highland Show and Blair Castle International Horse Trials. She also regularly contributes to the weekly H&H podcast.

    Based in north Scotland, Becky learnt to ride at the age of five. She got the showjumping bug with her 13.2hh older pony Phoenix, who used to particularly enjoy a chase-me-Charlie. She went on to compete in British Showjumping and riding club activities as a teenager with her pony Sparkle. After losing two horses in 2015 to illness and injury, Becky is now producing two Irish mares, Ruby and Chloe, and hopes to get back in the showjumping ring in the future. She also has two miniature Shetland sisters, Mootie and Poppet, who keep her on her toes.


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