‘Heavy hearts’ at Bransby Horses as long-term friend put down

Tributes have been paid to a “much-loved” long-term Bransby Horses resident who was put down aged 19.

Jigily arrived at the welfare charity in 2004 after being diagnosed with wobbler’s syndrome, the common name for the neurological disease occurring when incorrectly formed vertebrae in the neck pinch the spinal cord, when his owner was no longer able to care for him.

A spokesman for the charity said it was with “heavy hearts” the 14.2hh gelding was put down on 6 December owing to health issues.

“Jigily has been a much-loved member of the Bransby Horses family,” he said.

“During his 15 years here he was most likely seen near the visitor centre or main yard, happy to have a scratch and a stroke from visitors coming to see him. He also loved to see what staff were up to, by following them around and peering at what they were doing.”

Visitor centre team leader Shell Craven said saying goodbye to Jigily was “particularly difficult” for her as the gelding was a long-term resident and a “firm favourite” of staff, supporters and visitors.

“Losing him is tough but we have lots of great memories and he had a good life with us,” she said. “Thank you to staff and supporters for your kind words and thoughts, in person and through social media; as always, it means so much.

“The team is so good at coming together to support one another, especially in difficult times like this. Knowing we can make a difference to the lives of hundreds of horses like Jigily makes this job more than worthwhile.”



The spokesman added that former horses and ponies of the charity will never be forgotten.

“Like all those who have left our family in 2019, we all take time to remember them and their wonderful personalities,” he said.

“Jigily had a good life and that is entirely thanks to the support given to us over the years, support that has meant we can do our job, giving them the best care possible.”

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