Would you be up for making the move to this glorious Irish stud and estate, which has come on the market for a cool €9.25m? We think we could be persuaded…

Located in Kilcock, Co Meath in Ireland is Dollanstown stud and estate, a farm with 364 acres and some exceptional equestrian facilities.

Situated 21 miles from Dublin, the property is in a prime location that is synonymous with equestrianism. The area is home to many leading studs, bloodstock sales, racecourses and eventing venues.

If you’re keen to pick up a winter project, well-known auctioneers can be found locally at Tattersalls in Co Meath (13 miles) and Goffs in Co Kildare (17 miles).

The legendary Dublin Horse Show showground is 24 miles from your doorstep.

Racecourses in the area include: Fairyhouse (13 miles), Naas (15.5 miles) and Punchestown (20.5 miles).

If you want to get out competing, local equestrian centres include: Bachelors Lodge (29 miles) and Kells (36 miles).

Head out with hounds with the Meath or the Dublin Meath Farmers Drag.

Currently on the market for just under €10m (£8.230m), the estate is being offered sale by Savills. 

Let’s go for a look around…

The jewel in the crown of Dollanstown is the range of equestrian facilities.

There are 71 stables split between seven yards: the traditional courtyard, the main yard, the back gate lodge yard, the back gate yard, the opposite back gate yard, the Newtown yard and the isolation yard.

As well as an indoor arena, there are two outdoor arenas with all-weather surfaces.

In addition to the all-weather gallops, there is a horse walker and a Dutch barn.

The remains of a top-class cross-country course, last used in 2000, still exists around the estate. It hosted, among others, the Irish advanced eventing championships and trials for the Olympic Games and European Championships. It includes a wide variety of fences such as a water fence, devil’s dyke and derby bank.

A farm is currebtly run at Dollanstown, alongside the equestrian enterprise. A feature of the farm land is the excellent access throughout the estate, including a network of internal roads and tracks.

The main house reportedly dates back to the 1700s and has undergone a full programme of renovation and redecoration.

Notable period features include flagstones, sash and case windows, detailed carving within the wooden finishes, picture rails, fitted bookshelves in the library, marble mantelpieces and timber floors.

At present, the house has seven bedrooms, four of which are en-suite, as well as an entertainment wing with two reception rooms and kitchen.

There are several other properties located around the estate, including a manager’s house, three lodges, a studio apartment and a cottage.

The magnificent gardens and grounds are another significant feature of the property…

When can we move in?

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