7 examples of really bad equestrian advice

Whether it’s via social media, online forums or from the mouth of the yard know-it-all, there is plenty of bad advice offered up by some where horses are involved. Here are a few examples that we’ve been lucky enough to receive over the years…

1. That drugs will solve everything — one case in point was when the owner of a livery yard told a client to give their lame pony bute so that they could keep riding it…

2. A change of tack will solve all your riding problems — there is no disputing that there are definitely fashions around tack. A few years ago eventers were all about five-point breastplates and the crank noseband was essential for any serious dressage horse. Now anatomical nosebands/bridles appear to be all the rage in the showjumping area. The fads will continue to come and go, but time (and money) spent on training is likely to benefit you, and your horse, far more than the latest bit of kit that everyone is raving about.

3. Every horse can benefit from going barefoot — ah, this one is a beauty. Yes, there is no doubt that some horses can benefit from time spent without shoes, but that doesn’t mean that every horse can work successfully without them. Some do, which will save their own owners a small fortune in shoeing costs over the years (lucky them!), while others only need to be shod in front. However, there are plenty of horses that do benefit from being shod all-round. If in doubt, take advice from your vet and farrier. They are the experts who really know what’s best for your horse.

4. On the subject of purchasing a new horse/pony — get a young horse or pony for a young rider and they can grow up together. Now this isn’t always bad advice but more often than not, it can prove problematic…

5. Someone recommending engine oil to treat sweet itch, on Facebook…

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6. Horse being naughty to ride? Someone had the great idea that lungeing it into the ground would make it behave — we’re pretty sure horses’ brains don’t work that way?

7. Are you going eventing next week? Well one person once advised not riding your horse at all the week prior to the event to ensure optimum performance on competition day…

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