Horse jumps picnic table and 10 other stunning photos of military horses in all their glory

Each year, the Army holds a photographic competition, giving keen amateur photographers, whether they are civilians, in the Navy, Royal Air Force or Army, the chance to showcase their prowess behind a camera.

The traditional categories are open to all regular Army and Army reserve personnel and cadets of the Combined Cadet Force (CCF), Army Cadet Force (ACF), University Officer Training Corps (Army) and Ministry of Defence (MoD) civilians who work directly for the Army.

This gives photographers the chance to capture life on front lines and in training areas around the world, including those involving military horses, and the winners of the 2018 competition were recently revealed.

Household Cavalry Soldier, Lance Corporal of Horse (LCoH), Adam Blackmore-Heal is more used to being part of the ceremonial parades in London. However he turned this to his advantage as he took several photos for the amateur categories of the competition.

Using this to his advantage, Adam scooped first place in the sports category. His stunning photo shows a military horse and rider leaping over a table, titled ‘Making an Entrance’, which is pictured below.

Other photos included a selection from The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery on ceremonial duties and behind the scenes in London, in addition to military mascots and a super equine portrait from the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.

Here are a few of the equine-related images that were submitted into this year’s running of the competition…

Andrew Williams — ‘Mascot Meeting’

LCoH Adam Blackmore Heal — ‘Prepare to Dismount’

Sgt Donald Todd (RLC)

Sgt Philip Carr — ‘Soverign Shadow’

Photographer: Corporal Stephen Harvey/MoD Crown

Members of the RHA Kings troop prepare at Wellington barracks on the 24/04/2018, for the new Royal babies 41 gun salute, this takes place at 1400 today in various locations around London, after the happy announcement yesterday, at Buckingham palace that Princess Kate Duchess of Cambridge has given birth to a son. Photographer: Corporal Stephen Harvey / MoD Crown

Sgt Donald C Todd RLC — ‘Royal Wedding’

Around 250 members of the Armed forces took part in celebrations in Windsor today for the Royal Wedding of HRH Prince Henry of Wales and Ms Meghan Markle. The Royal Navy, British Army and Royal Air Force are all providing ceremonial support to mark the occasion. Units that hold a special relationship with Prince Harry were chosen at the request of Kensington Palace. Some of the troops performing ceremonial duties today served alongside Prince Harry during his ten years in the Army. From 9.30am this morning, the Band of the Irish Guards entertained crowds as they gathered to watch events unfold around Windsor. The State Trumpeters of the Band of the Household Cavalry played fanfares in St George’s Chapel to mark the arrival of HM The Queen and Ms Meghan Markle ahead of the wedding service. Members of the Household Cavalry lined the steps of St George’s Chapel as the guests leave the wedding service. After the service, a travelling Escort of the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment accompany the bride and groom during the carriage procession through Windsor. The streets inside Windsor Castle were lined by servicemen and women from Royal Navy Small Ships and Diving, 30 Commando IX Group the Royal Marines, The 1st Battalion Irish Guards, 3 Regiment Army Air Corps, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, and personnel from RAF Honington. Prince Harry joined the Army in 2005 and was commissioned as an Officer in 2006 after training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. He joined The Blues and Royals, one of two regiments in the Household Cavalry, in April 2006. Prince Harry served in the Army for ten years, undertaking two tours of Afghanistan and rising to the rank of Captain. Both Prince Harry and Ms. Meghan Markle have shown their continued support for serving Armed Forces personnel and veterans in their benevolent work, most recently in their support of the Invictus Games Foundation. Sgt Donald C Todd RLC

SSgt Rupert Frere —‘King’s Horses’

The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery on the playing fields before Royal Artillery Barracks Major General Ben Bathurst, General Officer Commanding The Household Division, conducted his annual inspection of The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery on the playing fields before Royal Artillery Barracks, in Woolwich today. The inspection determined whether the Army’s ceremonial saluting battery is fit to perform its duties on behalf of the nation for the next twelve months. All Major General’s inspections are testing times for Army units, but this one takes place in full public view with the soldiers and horses performing one of the most heart-stopping and difficult displays in the ceremonial canon. The colourful and spectacular display included the world-famous Musical Drive. The Musical Drive is one of the most spectacular displays of horsemanship in the world involving risk laden complex choreographed moves with split second timing. Six magnificently turned–out horses draw each of six 13 pounder Field Guns and limbers, with the Gun detachment riding behind each Gun. The Guns in the Troop display all saw service in the First World War. Photographer: SSgt Rupert Frere RLC / MoD Crown

Sgt Paul Randall — ‘Chomping at the bit’

SSgt Rupert Frere —‘King’s Horses 2’

The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery Riding on the playing fields before Royal Artillery Barracks Major General Ben Bathurst, General Officer Commanding The Household Division, conducted his annual inspection of The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery on the playing fields before Royal Artillery Barracks, in Woolwich today. The inspection determined whether the Army’s ceremonial saluting battery is fit to perform its duties on behalf of the nation for the next twelve months. All Major General’s inspections are testing times for Army units, but this one takes place in full public view with the soldiers and horses performing one of the most heart-stopping and difficult displays in the ceremonial canon. The colourful and spectacular display included the world-famous Musical Drive. The Musical Drive is one of the most spectacular displays of horsemanship in the world involving risk laden complex choreographed moves with split second timing. Six magnificently turned–out horses draw each of six 13 pounder Field Guns and limbers, with the Gun detachment riding behind each Gun. The Guns in the Troop display all saw service in the First World War. Photographer: SSgt Rupert Frere RLC / MoD Crown

SSgt Rupert Frere —‘King’s Horses 3’Major General Ben Bathurst, General Officer Commanding The Household Division, conducted his annual inspection of The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery on the playing fields before Royal Artillery Barracks, in Woolwich today. The inspection determined whether the Army’s ceremonial saluting battery is fit to perform its duties on behalf of the nation for the next twelve months. All Major General’s inspections are testing times for Army units, but this one takes place in full public view with the soldiers and horses performing one of the most heart-stopping and difficult displays in the ceremonial canon. The colourful and spectacular display included the world-famous Musical Drive. The Musical Drive is one of the most spectacular displays of horsemanship in the world involving risk laden complex choreographed moves with split second timing. Six magnificently turned–out horses draw each of six 13 pounder Field Guns and limbers, with the Gun detachment riding behind each Gun. The Guns in the Troop display all saw service in the First World War. Photographer: SSgt Rupert Frere RLC / MoD Crown

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