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Carl Hester: ‘Young riders must dig deep and learn’ *H&H Plus*

Carl Hester shares his thoughts on why riders shouldn’t expect to be handed a career on a plate and how times have changed since he started out. He explains why hard work is still a necessity, as is poo-picking, no matter how many medals you might have to your name

The National Grand Prix Championship later this month is taking shape very nicely. It’s great to learn that although it will be behind closed doors, the public will be able to watch a livestream for free.

Indeed, one upside of this year is how people have embraced technology. I heard the digital British Dressage (BD) National Convention, held at the end of November, was a huge success, with people watching in their pyjamas, or being able to nip out and do their horses halfway through.

I have also heard great reports about the judges’ day, where Peter Storr and Clive Halsall marked tests on a normal sheet then discussed their marks with the rider, while each movement was shown in slow motion. One rider to make the most of the opportunity was my former apprentice Katie Bailey; she recently took prix st georges honours at the Vale View High Profile Show, where another graduate of mine, Amy Woodhead, swept the board across the levels.

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