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Fireworks blamed for horses’ death

The noise from fireworks is being blamed for the death of two horses in Hampshire

Two horses died last week after becoming frightened by fireworks in their field in Damerham, Hampshire.

The two geldings, eight-year-old Ross, a 16.1hh eventer and nine-year-old Max, a 16.1hh showjumper, were found dead in their field. They had suffered such severe injuries that their owner Robert Cobb initially thought they had been the victims of a vicious attack.

It appears that the two horses were frightened by the loud bangs of fireworks let off at a private opera evening held near their field.

Panicked by the noise, it is believed they collided head on with each other and died within a matter of minutes.

A post mortem carried out by Liphook Equine Hospital concluded that the severity of the injuries could not have been caused a human being, and compared them to those found ona horse hit by a lorry.

A spokesperson for Hampshire and Isle of Wight police said: “It appears that the incident was a freak accident.”

“Although fireworks were being used in the area that evening, there was no foul play and nothing to suggest any criminal activity.

Owner Robert Cobb said: “We had gone out for the evening and when we returned at about 11.30pm, everything was quiet and it wasn’t until the morning that we found them.”

“We were not forewarned about the fireworks display and this tragic incident highlights the need for responsible behaviour when using pyrotechnics.”

A spokesperson for Fantastic Fireworks, a company that supplies and stages firework displays, said: “When we supply fireworks or put on a display, we issue something called the ‘skyway code’.

“This is a guide for people planning a firework display and part of it recommends that the host informs surrounding land and livestock owners.”

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