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British vet’s mission to Morocco

British vet Betty Chadwick, reports on her working trip to North Africa organised by international animal charity SPANA

Veterinary surgeon, Betty Chadwick, has just come back from a voluntary stint in Morocco with a thumbs up of the experience for vets who have just qualified.

The 10-week trip was organised by the Society for the Protection of Animals Abroad.

“It was a fantastic experience to get exposure to different types of wounds and illnesses. It gives you great scope to enhance your confidence,” she said.

However, Betty pinpointed the need for more animal care education in the country.

” I went out thinking I was going to see a lot of cruelty cases, but the problem is much more one of ignorance and a lack of education.”

Betty was based at a clinic in Had Ouled Frej, a village south-west of Casablanca.

“We spent the morning at the market – mainly rasping teeth and worming. On average we saw around 35- 40 animals a day, mostly donkeys and mules.

“In the afternoon we treated 15-20 animals in the hospital, which also has a number of in-patients.

“It was a very busy time as we never turned animals away. Sometimes I was working seven days a week, although I did have a couple of long weekends off. “

Betty, who qualified at Bristol University last year, is now spending two weeks at an RSPCA clinic in Putney, South London while she looks for a permanent job.

SPANA helps working animals such as horses and donkeys throughout the world, including Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria.

  • For more information on this charity visit www.spana.org
  • Click here to read how SPANA has been helping working donkeys in Tunisia, Jordan and Syria with specially made nosebands.
  • Click here to read about the first female farrier in North Africa, who was trained by SPANA.
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