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H&H columnists’ have their say

Lucy Higginson says . . .

“It would be a grave mistake for the MPs who voted for a complete hunt ban to assume that they will wipe out hunting from horseback. I’m talking about the fact that vast numbers of hunting people won’t abide by a ban.

“Many of you will have met them; decent people who are utterly resolved, if it comes to it, to hunt illegally. Perhaps you are one of them. It will grieve them horribly to break the law; they are not troublemakers by nature. But they will not relinquish a right they consider morally theirs.”

Lynn Russell says . . .

“When amateur owner-rider classes were introduced, they attracted a lot of enthusiasm. So why have so many people voiced their unhappiness about the way the classesare going?

“Several riders have told me they would like to see the rules tightening up so that, in classes for amateur riders, professionals would not be allowed in the ring at any stage. The other grumble is that too many riders stick to the law, but not the spirit of the game by keeping their horses in professional yards and only getting on them after they’ve been warmed up.”

David Broome says . . .

“Britain has plenty of good riders, but at championship level, it’s my belief that a good horse represents 80/85% of the partnership, while the rider contributes the rest.

“We’ve proved that we can obtain good horses and produce them up to championship level. Previously, they rarely left our shores. We now have to question why our show jumping owners won’t retain horses for British riders. Is it a lack of confidence, should they have more imput — do they have any ideas? Remember that a workman is only as good as his tools.”

Pammy Hutton says . . .

“Watching and riding at medium level gives a good clue as to what’s looking good for the future. There are so many lovely horses, and on the whole, some not bad riding either.

“Of those having problems, it appears knowing how to obtain the maximum is what’s lacking. Watching one rider it looked as though the Porsche had been bought to do its required job — but the driver neededa few lessons. If a tenth of the cost was spent on tuition, the brake pads and clutch might last longer. Of course, regular servicing is still required thereafter . . .”

  • Do you agree with the columnists’ views? Why not have your say in the HHO forum or write to: The Editor, Horse & Hound, Kings Reach Tower, Stamford Street, London, SE1 9LS
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