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All in a day’s work for royal saddle maker Adrian Benge *H&H Plus*

Adrian Benge on organising a birthday party for The Queen and making flying harnesses for Superman, as told to Helen Triggs

It was Harvey Smith who inspired me to try saddlery making. I was a member of the Royal Corps of Transport Band at Aldershot and we played at Horse of the Year Show and the Royal International. One year I was asked to look after the foreign riders’ room (although it was mainly British riders in there). I watched Harvey Smith stitching a bridle and it sparked my interest.

I went to the King’s Troop barracks in London and I spent time in their workshop. After that I asked if I could learn. The army bands used to finish work at 12pm so I would leave Aldershot and drive to St John’s Wood and I learned my skills there.


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