The winners of this year’s Army Photographic Competition were announced last week (28 October) at a ceremony held at The Royal Hospital Chelsea — with these striking equestrian images taking centre stage.

‘Gun Team’: winner of the professional portfolio award, taken by Sgt Rupert Frere of the Royal Logistics Core

"</p

Sgt Rupert Frere captured the horses and artillerymen of the King’s Troop putting on a demonstration of their world famous musical drive for the Major General in Charlton Park in April.

The inspection determines whether the unit is fit to perform ceremonial and public duties for the next 12 months.

The inspection began at their purpose built equestrian centre and offices in George VI Lines, Woolwich with the Major General rigorously inspecting the standard of kit, the soldiers, the officers and the guns.

The men and women of The Troop spent several days polishing leather and brass, and behind every groomed mane, perfectly trimmed tail and glinting spur lay hours of physical effort, dedication and very early mornings.

Then the inspection moved to Charlton Park where members of the public witnessed a world class display involving 68 magnificently turned out horses and 59 soldiers performing the musical drive.

Continued below…

‘Surf’s up’: winner of the professional sport award, taken by Sgt Rupert Frere

ARMY PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION 2015 Cat. 4 - Professional Sport - Winner 'Surf's Up' - Sgt Rupert FRERE RLC SADDLES OFF FOR CEREMONIAL SEA HORSES ON WATERGATE BAY The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery has left the noise and confines of London for equestrian and military training in the rural West Country. Enjoying the best of the Indian Summer in Cornwall, twelve horses and riders from Centre Section left their temporary stables in RAF St Mawgan just after dawn this morning to take to the surf on Watergate Bay Beach. The freedom and bracing sea breezes are a world away from the unit's high-profile day to day ceremonial activities in the busy capital. The visit to Cornwall is a vital military and equestrian training exercise which is impossible to deliver in the confines of a London-based barracks. Beach work in particular may look like fun; but it is an essential part of the never-ending work to build trust and confidence between horse and rider. Not all horses have seen the sea before, or have the confidence to go into the churning surf, and the waves at Watergate Bay are particularly powerful. Even a confident horse can be spooked when the sand beneath their hooves starts to shift and sink. But by trusting their rider and overcoming their fears, the bond between horse and rider is made stronger, and this then becomes vital for dealing with the unpredictable during high-profile ceremonial duties back in London. Photographer: Sergeant Rupert Frere RLC

Sgt Rupert Frere took this photo of the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery when they had left the noise and confines of London for equestrian and military training in the rural West Country.

Enjoying the best of the Indian Summer in Cornwall, 12 horses and riders from Centre Section left their temporary stables in RAF St Mawgan just after dawn to take to the surf on Watergate Bay Beach. The freedom and bracing sea breezes are a world away from the unit’s high-profile day-to-day ceremonial activities in the busy capital.

‘Ceremonial selfie’: runner-up in the professional portfolio category, taken by Cpl Jamie Peters of the Royal Logistics Core
Army photography competition

Cpl Jamie Peters captured this moment in the stables before the Colonel’s Review in June when a Grenadier Guard took the opportunity for a selfie with one of the ceremonial horses involved in the parade.

It was a double Welsh celebration on Horse Guards Parade as 1,100 soldiers, more than 350 musicians and almost 250 military horses performed the Colonel’s Review under the expert eye of HRH The Prince of Wales. The Prince of Wales was celebrating 40 years as the Regimental Colonel of the Welsh Guards and the Welsh Guards were celebrating their centenary.