Runners are hoping to raise thousands for equestrian causes as the London Marathon edges closer.

With just six weeks to go until the big day (23 April), runners are entering their final stretch of training.

H&H news writer and digital sub-editor Rachael Turner (pictured, top) will be among those pounding the capital’s pavements as she takes on the 26.2-mile route in aid of World Horse Welfare — which is also H&H’s charity of the year.

“I write many news stories about the charity’s often harrowing welfare cases and campaigning work, so it’s a cause close to my heart,” said Rachael.

“World Horse Welfare works tirelessly to help these animals and it’s charity I’m proud to be able to run for.

“Any funds, however big or small will help make a difference. Thank you so much for your support.”

Click here to support Rachael

Freddie Allen (pictured, below) is running the marathon for Brooke in memory of his mother, eventer Jo Lomas, who passed away in 2012 following an accident turning her horses out.

London marathon

 

This will be the first marathon he has run for charity and he said that Brooke was his “first and only choice”.

Donations on his JustGiving page have already topped £2,000.

Click here to support Freddie

Also fundraising for Brooke are vets Carolyne Crowe and Brian Faulkner, who are taking on 10 marathons in 10 days.

They will be running in extreme locations across the British Isles, finishing with the London Marathon on 23 April, and hope to raise £10,000.

The pair start their 260-mile journey in Wahilgoe, Northern Scotland, and will take on punishing terrains including Land’s End and Galway.

“I will be 40 in 2017 and I wanted a big challenge; this seemed as good as any,” said Carolyne.

“I also believe in creating stories to tell my grandchildren and I’m sure a few good ones will come from this adventure.”

Click here to support Carolyne and Brian

Running for the Animal Health Trust is Anysia Huggins.

London marathon

This will be the first marathon for Anysia, who is hoping to raise £2,000.

The 24-year-old overcame a serious leg injury seven years ago to learn to walk, ride and eventually run again.

A fall during a gridwork lesson left her with a shattered femur. She was rushed to hospital and spent four hours in theatre having emergency surgery, where she needed blood transfusions and pins and rods were inserted into her leg.

Anysia said she is feeling “very nervous”, but is looking forward to the celebratory glass of fizz at the finish line.

Click here to support Anysia

Are you running the London Marathon for an equine cause, or know someone who is? Get in touch with lucy.elder@timeinc.com to be added to the article.