An owner whose mare died in a “horrific” incident involving a rampaging stallion has urged those with entire horses to be more considerate towards neighbouring owners.

Carry Smart’s 14-year-old mare Holly died from a heart attack on 17 August. A stallion jumped into a field near Bromsgrove, Worcs, with her five mares and two Shetlands.

Carry’s daughter Lauren told H&H that all the mares had been “run ragged all night”.

“We were totally unaware that a stallion had been put in the field next door,” said Lauren. “He just broke through and went wild. We came down the next day and Holly was in a horrendous state. There was blood everywhere, as she’d been mounted God knows how many times.”

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She said the other mares also suffered cuts, bruises and bites while being harassed by the stallion and that an 18-month-old filly is in-foal.

“I told the police, but they said there was nothing more they could do,” said Lauren.

When contacted by H&H the owner of the stallion disputed these claims, saying the eight-month old colt was usually “very good” and that the mare “hadn’t a bite on her”.

World Horse Welfare’s Debbie Graver said stallion owners should consider whether they “really need” to keep their animal entire.

“However, if owners intend to keep their horse entire, they must make sure it is kept in a secure environment and preferably out of sight and smell of mares.”

In regards to mare owners, Debbie added: “If your mare is injured or killed, seek legal advice. This also applies if you need to recover costs from having a vet to stop a pregnancy.”

Hanna Campbell from HorseSolictor added: “If any horse enters someone else’s field and causes injury to another horse or property damage, the general rule is that the owner of that horse is liable for the damage caused.”

This news story was first published in Horse & Hound magazine (5 September 2013).