A new Royal International Horse Show (RIHS) supreme pony champion has been announced for 2016 — nearly four months after the show took place.

Tambrook My Destiny, one of three ponies to share the joint-reserve supreme spot at the RIHS in July, was upgraded to the top accolade after guests voted at Hickstead’s Showtime Ball on Saturday (19 November).

Golden Tasset was originally handed supreme honours at Hickstead but the chestnut, who was partnered by Olivia Bowen and also claimed the intermediate tricolour, was later stripped of his title after failing a test for a prohibited substance.

On Saturday evening, the individual shows given by all three reserve ponies was screened to 150 ball guests before they cast their votes. Coloured champion Tambrook My Destiny was subsequently crowned the new overall winner.

The eight-year-old skewbald is owned by the Farmbrough family and ridden by Lucinda Farmbrough. The mare, by a grade A showjumper and out of a show hunter pony mare, was home-produced until this season, when she was moved to Norfolk producer Allister Hood’s yard.

Due to being on holiday in Barcelona, Lulu missed seeing Tambrook My Destiny crowned the new RIHS supreme at the ball, where the prize was collected by her mother, Tricia.

I was really gutted I couldn’t go to the ball, but I’m so happy to win,” said Lucinda.

Mountain and Moorland champion Slieve Bloom Jill and the overall show hunter pony winner Wolferlow Esperanto remain as joint-reserve supreme champions.

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Golden Tasset’s owner Leo Bowen was suspended for a year from “all or any of the rights and privileges of membership of the BSPS” by the British Show Pony Society (BSPS)’s disciplinary committee on Tuesday 27 September and fined £1,000.

A sample had been taken from the chestnut pony at random at Hickstead in July and it showed the presence of flunixin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

As well as the fine and suspension, Golden Tasset was stripped of his RIHS title and lost his Horse of the Year Show qualification.

Mr Bowen was also required to pay the dope-testing fee of £1,128. He told H&H in October that he intended to appeal the decision.