Were you out recently with the Kimblewick Hunt when they met in Bishopstone on the day the Horse & Hound hunting correspondent visited?

If so, why not have a look at the pictures below to see if you were spotted by our photographer (who managed to make it to the meet despite a collision with a bridge en route).

Take a look at the Kimblewick in pictures

Photos by Nico Morgan

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Tina Barber gives a tiger trap plenty of air

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Kate Howlett and Stan

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Bobby Howard Jones jumps behind Rod Wilson

Julian Price joins the tumblers club

Julian Price joins the tumblers club

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The Berkeley tawny yellow livery is worn by hunt staff

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Richard Roberts

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Alex Jackson, son of joint-master Helen

Terence Smith flies a hunt rail

Terence Smith flies a hunt rail

Looking smart at the meet

Looking smart at the meet

Majid and Fiona Mohammadi

Majid and Fiona Mohammadi

Mother and daughter Amanda and Sue Parker

Mother and daughter Amanda and Sue Parker

Jane Davies multi-tasking

Jane Davies multi-tasks

The Kimblewick Hunt at Standalls Farm 22/11

The meet at Standalls Farm

The Kimblewick Hunt covers parts of six counties — Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire, Hertfordshire and Oxfordshire — and is roughly the size of Cornwall. With such a large country, the terrain is varied but includes woodland areas, plough, grass and heathland, with one of their most popular grassland areas being in their Vale country which surrounds the kennels.

The country is well-fenced, with plenty of jumpable hedges and hunt jumps which makes it accessible and good to cross.

The hunt was previously known as the Vale of Aylesbury with Garth & South Berks, however was renamed after the village where the kennels are located, in 2010.

The Vale of Aylesbury was formed followed an amalgamation of the Old Berkeley, Hertfordshire and South Oxfordshire Hunts, while the Garth and South Berks Hunts also joined forces, before they were all united in 2002.

The hunt staff wear the distinctive tawny yellow livery of the Old Berkeley, while masters wear the same colour yellow collars on their hunt coats.

With a solid mastership and great support, the Kimblewick Hunt is well worth a visit.

For the full report on H&H’s visit, see our report in 11 December issue and take a look at the full gallery at www.horseandhound.co.uk/galleries