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Helpers come to aid of horses caught up in California wild fires

Helpers are doing all they can to rescue and care for horses and other animals separated from their owners in the California wild fires.

The fires have caused widespread devastation in the US state, destroying tens of thousands of acres and hundreds of homes, with the human death toll on Wednesday reaching 48 while many remain missing.

Thousands of firefighters are tackling the blazes and evacuation orders are in force across areas of the state.

Individuals and social media have been instrumental in reuniting animals and their owners, while numerous organisations are helping rescue and care for those in need.

Volunteers have been working to care for animals in need at shelters and to reunite owners with lost companions.

The Humane Society of Ventura County is acting as a sanctuary for animals evacuated from their homes.

It has also helped to rescue horses from fire-hit properties, providing them with veterinary care and safe shelter.

“We would like to take this opportunity to thank you all for the outpour of support we have received,” said a HSVC spokesman.

“Our hearts go out to all those who have been affected by the fires, and we remain committed to helping those animals and their families during this time.

“To those who have animals in our care, we would like to reassure you they are all accounted for and doing well. We will continue to care for your animals as long as need be so please keep yourselves and your families safe.”

The County of Los Angeles Department of Animal Care and Control and the UC Davis Veterinary Emergency Response Team are among the other organisations helping care for horses and animals affected by the fires.

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The North Valley Animal Disaster Group (NVADG), which works with emergency agencies and responders to help people and animals in times of crisis, has handled more than 6,000 calls and has over 1,800 animals in its care.

 

“Thank you for the outpouring of support for the work of all-volunteer, all-donation-supported NVADG,” said a spokesman.

“We have many teams behind the fire lines evacuating, feeding and watering animals.

“Veterinarians are with us providing emergency animal care/triage as well. Teams are transferring animals just outside the evacuation road-blocks to emergency response volunteers who are transporting animals to the emergency shelters.

“We appreciate the support of all our partners during this unprecedented fire event.”

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