British Eventing (BE) is standing by its ban on helmet cameras.

The organisation brought in a blanket ban on hat cameras in October, due to a lack of information about the devices’ potential danger in a fall.

The move was triggered by a comment from a French journalist, who said that he believed that the injuries sustained by Formula One driver Michael Schumacher in a skiing accident had been worsened by his head camera.

The journalist, Jean-Louis Moncet, subsequently said that this was only his “opinion”.

However, BE has said today (Friday 24 April) that after a “lengthy discussion” at the recent BE risk management committee meeting, it was decided that “BE would continue not to grant permissions for cameras to be worn during BE affiliated competition.”

“This will be maintained until further research is done into the mounting of cameras, to examine whether or not they exacerbate injury in the event of a fall,” read the statement.

“A significant amount of time has been spent discussing this particular subject in recent months and the decision has not been taken lightly.

“BE sees safety and welfare as the number one priority and takes this responsibility very seriously.

“The composition of the safety committee includes senior medical advisers and while recognising some people’s desire to use cameras, the committee is mindful of the possible injuries that could be sustained in a fall if certain types of cameras are used. However, BE shall continue to try to find a solution that is acceptable to everyone.”

Eventing Ireland has already followed the United States Equestrian Federation’s lead and reversed its ban on the use of helmet cameras in competition.

At international competitions run under FEI rules, head cams are allowed, but only when “specifically agreed by the FEI”.

In this situation the technical delegate (TD) is required to check how the cameras are set up on the helmet.