The inspirational triple Olympic gold medallist Richard Meade died on 8 January 2015, aged 76. He had been diagnosed with cancer in October 2014.

Richard was a member of the British eventing team for 21 years. He was admired for his coolness under pressure, and his ability to get the best out of any horse — even those he didn’t have an established partnership with.

He made his first Olympic appearance at Tokyo in 1964 and finished eighth — the highest placed British rider. He then secured team gold at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico, as well as at the 1972 Munich Games where he also won indiviual gold.

Richard’s eventing legacy lives on through his son Harry, who represented Britain at last summer’s World Equestrian Games.

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Aboard his 1970 Badminton winner The Poacher

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A royal pat from the Queen Mother for The Poacher who brought 31-year-old Richard his first Badminton victory in 1970

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Crossing the sheepwash fence with The Poacher at the World Championships at Punchestown in 1970. It was here Richard clinched team gold and individual silver medals

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Prince Philip awards Richard and his horse Laurieston with their individual gold medal at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, where he also won team gold. In second place was Alessa Argenton of Italy riding Woodland (left) and in third, Sweden’s Jan Jonsson riding Sarajevo (right)

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With his gold medal at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich

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Soaking up the double Olympic gold victory at the 1972 Munich Games with Laurieston

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Riding Jacob Jones at the 1976 Montreal Olympics

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On the way to another Badminton victory in 1982 with Speculator III

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Jumping a clear round on the way to winning Badminton in 1982 on Speculator III

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During the presentation at Badminton in 1982 on Speculator III

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Competing in a special class at Olympia Horse Show in 1987

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Out hunting with the Duke of Beaufort’s near Badminton House in 1987

Read memories and tributes from Richard Meade’s teammates and friends in this week’s issue of H&H (Thursday 15 January).