A cheeky Shetland was given a royal telling-off after attempting to eat The Queen’s flowers.

Her Majesty was visiting Stirling Castle and had been handed a bouquet as she arrived for mass yesterday (Thursday, 6 July) afternoon.

As The Queen made her way into the chapel, she paused to speak to Lance Corporal Cruachan IV — the regimental mascot of the Royal Regiment of Scotland — and his handler.

The sharp-eyed pony made a swipe for the flowers and was firmly told to “go away” by the monarch, who tucked the bouquet safely behind her back and gave him a pat.

“They always try to eat the flowers,” she added.

LCpl Cruachan IV later “tweeted”: “I love the fact Her Majesty The Queen always brings me a treat”.

The eight-year-old gelding started his service as regimental mascot in 2012, taking over the role from Cruachan III who had retired aged 23.

Article continues below…


You might also be interested in:


The tradition started in 1928 when Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, presented a Shetland pony to her regiment.

The name Cruachan comes from the war cry of Clan Campbell and he leads the regiment on parade on formal occasions and represents the regiment at events across Scotland.

According to the Sutherland and Argyll Highlanders’ Museum, his saddlecloth is Government Tartan 1A and gold, with an embroidered regimental badge.

He has a stripe of a lance corporal and two medals — one for the regiment’s service in Afghanistan and one for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee.

Earlier that day, the Queen also visited some of Scotland’s most famous horses — the Kelpies.

A new section of canal which runs beneath the sculptures was officially named after Her Majesty as the Queen Elizabeth II Canal.

The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh took a boat trip before meeting two Clydesdales — Spencer and Harry — in front of the Kelpies and sculptor Andy Scott.

Credit: Civil Service

For all the latest news analysis, competition reports, interviews, features and much more, don’t miss Horse & Hound magazine, on sale every Thursday