A 21in high sculpture of a Suffolk horse made from scrap metal has raised £2,100 for the Suffolk Horse Society, which promotes and protects this rare breed.

Suffolk Horse Society members, John and Linda Godfrey, commissioned full-time sculptor and fellow society member Harriet Mead to create the horse, which was auctioned at the society’s annual dinner last Friday.

“John felt that commissioning Harriet to create a Suffolk horse sculpture, which the society could use for fund-raising purposes, would be a great way to support the breed,” explains Linda, who, with her husband, is a hobby breeder of another British rare breed on the critical list, the Cleveland Bay.

“Unfortunately we couldn’t attend the evening ourselves but we were thrilled to hear how much it went for. We really had no idea how much it would make.”

Amanda Hillier, administrative secretary of the Suffolk Horse Society, echoed Linda’s sentiments saying: “We are absolutely delighted by the generosity of the Godfreys and the significant sum which the sculpture raised. The money will play a vital role in the society’s ongoing work to promote and preserve this rare breed.”

The sculpture is not the first Suffolk horse that Harriet, who owns five horses of various breeds and has been based in East Anglia for 13 years, has undertaken.

“I work mainly using scrap and found steel, the texture and colour of which is particularly suited to the Suffolk breed,” she explains.

Car bonnets, chains, nails and wire were all included in the Suffolk sculpture, which took around a fortnight to make.

“I used nails for the flights [traditional braids] in the horse’s mane and chains from an old farm harness for its tail, so it appeared to have its tail plaited up,” says Harriet.

“As well as a number of smaller horses including Suffolks, I have also created two life-size horse pieces – one of a Thoroughbred mare and foal and another of a Hanovarian/Throughbred horse, which I completed recently.”

For more information about Suffolk horses visit: www.suffolkhorsesociety.org.uk

To view examples of Harriet’s work visit: www.harrietmead.co.uk