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Three men, who were accused of being connected to the Ross Harriers, based in Herefordshire, have been convicted of illegal hunting under the Hunting Act 2004.

In October 2014 the trio were pulled over when the trailer they were towing had faulty lights. Upon inspection, the police found three dogs with facial scarring and a bag containing a live fox.

The men were arrested and when questioned claimed they had written permission for their activities but did not have the permission with them.

The men appeared in court on Friday 10 July.

A spokesperson for the RSPCA said: “This piece of information was to be the key to their successful prosecution as the Hunting Act 2004 states that those legally hunting in such circumstances must have written permission on their person.”

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Despite members of the Hunt Saboteurs Association claiming the three men were linked with the Ross Harriers, the hunt denies the allegations.

“These men were not acting for, nor had any formal links to the Ross Harriers hunt,” said the Countryside Alliance’s Tim Bonner.

“The hunt’s activities are entirely confined to those allowed by the Hunting Act and even before the ban would not have extended to foxes as they are were a harrier pack, that is to say they hunted hares.”

Earlier this month the RSPCA said it would no longer pursue those accused of illegal foxhunting through the courts.

This decision comes following a review by Stephen Wooler, former chief inspector of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), after the charity was accused of wasting funds and donations by prosecuting hunters for political reasons.

  • Jimmy Rivera

    We must stop this madness now and forever amen amen amen

  • linda Murray

    What a shame the RSPCA are not pursuing these animal sadists through the courts. The negative coverage of this brilliant organisation has worked. Fox hunting is barbaric those involved must be inhuman and rather sad.

  • 2wheels

    What disgusting revolting scum fox hunters are. Shame.