Do you know a broodmare who deserves recognition for an exceptional contribution to British breeding?

Nominations have now opened for the Horse & Hound outstanding mare award, which is presented annually in conjunction with the British Equestrian Federation (BEF).

The public have until 25 November to put forward their suggestions for the prize — which can recognise any mare, living or dead, from any discipline.

“We’re all about recognising where quality exists and where that has helped British breeding to flourish and exceed,” said BEF head of equine development Jan Rogers.

The judging process might take into account the horse’s competition record, or the success of her offspring and invites a broad range of applicants.

“The mare doesn’t have to be British-bred, she could have been imported from abroad, competed and had one outstanding youngster. We’re interested in honouring those who have made an impact on British breeding,” Ms Rogers said.

“If you know or have got a mare who has made a contribution, we want to hear about it.”

Last year’s winner was the Hanoverian mare Seven Percent, who has produced successful offspring across the disciplines, while in 2015 the award went to the Suffolk Whitton Daisy, who has helped contribute to the rare breed’s population.

The award will be presented at the annual British breeders’ awards dinner in London on January 14, 2017 and nominations can be made via the BEF’s website.

The public also have until December 2 to put forward their nominations for the Meritoire lifelong achievement award, which recognises an outstanding contribution to sport horse or pony breeding.


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Previous winners have included the Louella Stud, National Foaling Bank founder Johanna Vardon, Archie Smith Maxwell, breeder of high-ranking event sire Jumbo, and Professor Graham Suggett for work with studbooks and chairmanship of the former National Equine Database.

In 2015, the award was presented posthumously to eventer Richard Meade, while this year it was also awarded posthumously, to Richard Matson, council member of the British Horse Foundation and vice-chairman of the National Equine Forum.