Riders won’t be the only ones getting the hump if they’re not satisfied with their performance at two events this year.

Camel racing will be adding to the entertainment at Burnham Market International (13 – 15 April) and Houghton International Horse Trials (25-28 May).

On one day at each event (to be announced), pre-selected jockeys will take to their camels in a five-heat contest between eventing classes, before the heat winners fight it out for the main prize.

The races will be in aid of East Anglian Air Ambulance (EAAA), Musketeer Event Management’s (MEM) chosen charity of the year for both horse trials.

 Anyone able to ride a horse with “a certain amount of competence” can apply for one of the race places.

Those selected will be asked to raise £500 in sponsorship for the charity.

Details of how to register will be published on MEM and EAAA social media channels.

There are also opportunities for businesses to become involved.Camel ‘ownership’ is available on a race-by-race basis.

“All those involved in equestrianism, in any form, recognise the importance of air ambulance services across the United Kingdom,” said event director Alec Lochore.

“Working in a county with so much coastline, always a big draw for residents and holidaymakers, our spectators are equally likely to find themselves in EAAA’s debt, making it an ideal charity to team up with.

“We are delighted to be working with EAAA this year, promoting such a worthy cause; one which everyone who lives and works in, or visits, East Anglia could at any time need to call upon.”

This year EAAA has a fundraising goal of £11million.

Chief executive Patrick Peal explained the vital work carried out by the air ambulance.

“We are able to provide lifesaving medical support to critically ill patients by flying the hospital A&E to them,” he said.

Continues below…

Related articles:

“We then transport them, within minutes, to the most appropriate hospital for their clinical needs.

“Our patients receive the best possible emergency medical care, which can make the difference between long-term injury and recovery – even between life and death.”