We recognise that horse! H&H readers were shocked to spot Hickstead hero Adventure De Kannan accompanying a story about horsemeat on the Daily Mail online earlier this week (14 October, 2014).

Although fans of the one-eyed wonder horse expressed disgust and horror at the website’s use of the photo (see below), H&H is sure there is no cause for panic and Addy can sleep soundly at his home in Buckinghamshire.

“Absolutely sickened to have clicked on the Daily Mail this morning and seen they are using Trevor Breen’s horse Adventure de Kannan for an article regarding horses being used for human consumption,” said one irate reader.

The website quickly replaced the image — clearly realising the error of using one of the country’s most popular showjumpers to illustrate this particular story.

Addy’s regular rider Trevor Breen told H&H: “I’ve been away, but my wife told me she’d seen it. His owner [Karen Swann] was quite upset about the whole thing, so we’re pleased it’s been taken down. We’re not sure how he got on there in the first place.”

Daily-Mail-Screenshot
Addy, who had his eye removed in 2013 due to an ongoing issue, was propelled into the spotlight when he won the Hickstead Derby this summer.

The horse has an excellent record at the West Sussex venue — taking the speed derby in 2009 and the eventing grand prix in 2012.

And he was back in ribbons last week too — taking the Grandstand Trophy at the Horse of the Year Show.

The Daily Mail story was entitled “Horse, a healthy change to crisps: Biltong snack launches as healthy, high protein alternative to junk food”.

The snack has been launched by Musclefood.com as a health food for fitness fanatics and is reportedly a form of biltong, which is normally made from beef.

It is said to only have 114 calories in a 50g pack and is made in Belgium from Belgian horses.

Last year the horse world was horrified to discover some beef products were being sold that contained horsemeat — including lasagnes from Findus that were found to be 100% equine.

Princess Anne then created a further media storm when she suggested the ideal of eating horses as a potential solution to the ongoing equine welfare problem.