Jersey police’s decision not to follow up the alleged case of pony doping at a young rider competition last weekend has led the British Show Jumping Association (BSJA) to consider how to handle the matter itself.

A police spokeswoman has confirmed that a sedative was found at the showground, and that their analysts confirmed that the tablet they found was acetylpromazine (ACP). However they maintain that no laws have been broken and no further action is to be taken, even if the blood samples taken from two horses on the day prove to be contaminated.

As a result, the BSJA has said today that its Jersey Branch will “refer to its own constitution and regulations concerning the incident and form its own conclusions,” and also stressed that the responsibility in this kind of matter lies firmly with those who own or run the horse or pony concerned.

“The Association strongly recommends that ponies should not be left on their own where either the public or other competitors may be encouraged to feed the animals whether it is considered acceptable or not,” the statement said.

It also stressed that: “In the final event if the rules are infringed and a pony or horse has a positive test in respect of a prohibited substance, it is the ‘person responsible’ (owner, leesee, authorised agent or rider) that will be seriously taken to task.”

There is a chance that Kim Baudains and her son Josh could be punished with a fine or a suspension by the BSJA, should it be proven that she did intend to feed the ponies sedatives: “But of course this would be a decision for the Stewards,” a spokesperson was keen to point out.