“Peterborough” is many things: the world’s most prestigious Foxhound show, a hotbed of furious competition, the greatest gathering of bowler hats in the country. Founded in 1878, it has played a significant part in the evolution of the modern Foxhound, and has a rich history.

Michael Clayton has written a lively and thorough account of the show from its inception to the 2005 renewal. He is particularly good on the stories behind the results — the arguments, rivalries and personalities.

The “Memories, Memories…” section is fascinating — Lord Kimball recalls Heythrop huntsman Percy Durno asking him to tell Lord Ashton that “he must put his pullover on when it’s as cold as this” and Tim Unwin being told by the 10th Duke of Beaufort that his judging was the worst he had ever seen in 55 years.

Former Meynell huntsman and master Dermot Kelly is more serious: “Showing hounds… is a serious game, but is an amusing summer game, which shows the standard of hound to be reached for and is no substitute for foxhunting.” Quite, but hunting people must do something in the summer, and this is a highly readable and useful account of that.

Published by Quiller Press (ISBN 1904057888)

H&H readers have the exclusive chance to buy this fantastic book for just £20, plus £3 p&p, saving £5 off the retail price. To place your order contact Hannah Martin at the Peterborough Royal Foxhound Show Society on tel: 01733 234451 or email: hmartin@eastofengland.org.uk