Lynne Crowden of the Woodlander Stud kindly joined us on Tuesday 25 March to answer your horse breeding questions. See what interesting nuggets of useful information she had to share with us below.



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  Breeding live chat (03/25/2014) 
2:03
Lynne: 

Goodbye everyone…thank you for your interest. We can breed truly amazing horses in the UK. Good luck.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 2:03 Lynne
2:02
[Comment From Ethel EEthel E: ] 

Hugely useful, thank you so much Lynne — you are the font of all breeding knowledge and we are so lucky to have you in this country!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 2:02 Ethel E
2:02
H&H Carol: 

If you would like to find out more about the Woodlander Stud please visit the website at http://www.woodlanderstud.com. If you would like to contact Lynne please use the contact form on the website.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 2:02 H&H Carol
2:00
H&H Carol: 

A huge thank you to Lynne for being so generous with her time and knowledge today. I’ve certainly learnt a lot! We hope you’ve all found it useful.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 2:00 H&H Carol
2:00
Lynne: 

Oh Dawn,

His jumping is life threatening for all concerned, although he can jump out of the stallion pen and arena. His mother jumped well and Weltmeyer jumped well but he missed that hand out!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 2:00 Lynne
1:59
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 

And as a final question – have you jumped Wavavoom at all?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:59 Dawn
1:59
Lynne: 

OK, Lauren W,

I like Devils Jump and always saw very good top lines and big movement for a thoroughbred. I would pick a stallion with long legs, and scope…and a bit of blood or trakehner in the pedigree.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:59 Lynne
1:57
[Comment From Lauren WLauren W: ] 

Hi Lynne, off hand I cant remember her damline!! passport is in the lorry, she was bred by Ramseys the show producers.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:57 Lauren W
1:57
Lynne: 

Hi Lauren W
Do you mean Futurity? There is no foal grading per se, but they do all go for branding. We cannot take all to the Futurity as we have too many but we take all that are possible, and of course the best. Sometimes they thwart us by having accidents so some of the best can end up staying at home

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:57 Lynne
1:56
[Comment From Lauren WLauren W: ] 

Do you send all your foals for grading?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:56 Lauren W
1:55
Lynne: 

Hi Lauren,

What is the dam line of your lovely Devils Jump?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:55 Lynne
1:55
[Comment From Lauren WLauren W: ] 

Hi Lynne, I have a TB mare by Devils Jump, she’s a nice looking TB with a very good ridden temperament. What stallion would you suggest to get a bit of blood into a prospective dressage horse?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:55 Lauren W
1:53
Lynne: 

Good question, Carol,

For us it is imperative! People need to see the stallions that they are thinking of using and the stallions, unlike many of their foreign equivalents, do compete. Rockstar is Grand Prix, Wavavoom is AM (and was at 6 in Germany) Del Amitri has lacked a rider but will go out again this year (God willing ) at AM; Supertramp qualified last year for all Young horse Championships and will do the same this year and is working AM. They will all go that way..even the pony.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:53 Lynne
1:51
H&H Carol: 

How important is it to you for stallions to have successful competition records?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:51 H&H Carol
1:48
Lynne: 

Well, Carol,

I think we are a micro climate. We still are struggling with the quality and provenance of some of our mares, as is the case in Germany and Holland even when there are ten generations of selective breeding. We will only be on a par when we breed more as we will then have more good horses, as they do. They breed just as averagely as some of our breeders and do quite a good job in selling those average mares to us here!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:48 Lynne
1:46
H&H Carol: 

Lynne, so do you think that British breeding is now on a par with sport horse breeding in Europe? Or do we still have a way to go?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:46 H&H Carol
1:45
Lynne: 

Hi Sarah
I think the situation is vastly improved…actually thanks to passport legislation. Once people had to have passports the content of the pages became more of a focus. Pedigrees (proven ones) became a subject for discussion, and we were on our way. We still have a problem that we still lack an “industry” for warmbloods that we have for thoroughbreds and with that some individuals who would wish to “dumb down” what is required as they are not really in business in a serious way. And by “business” I don’t mean huge profits but rather proper investment and good quality processes.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:45 Lynne
1:45
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 

Sound advice! Thanks very much for your help – and agreed you should be writing a book!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:45 Dawn
1:42
[Comment From SarahSarah: ] 

Hi Lynne, Do you think the message is getting across regards indiscriminate breeding, or is this still an issue in Britain? When shouldn’t someone breed from their mare?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:42 Sarah
1:36
Lynne: 

Hi Dawn

Chose the one you fall in love with! We are riding Voom’s children and they are easy. We will know in two years re Supertramp. He also breeds bigger I think.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:36 Lynne
1:35
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 

That’s good to hear as Supertramp is top of my list! What would make you choose Wavavoom over Supertramp or vice versa? My mare has a super kind temperament but if anything tries too hard – and can be a bit sharp in that “Welsh” way!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:35 Dawn
1:34
H&H Carol: 

What a great idea! She is an absolute gold mine of information…

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:34 H&H Carol
1:34
[Comment From LaurenLauren: ] 

Lynne – should you write a book?!?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:34 Lauren
1:34
Lynne: 

Hi Mel,

This is a present horror for us. For years we just wormed every six weeks from birth and rarely for tape. Ten years ago we started worm counting but still wormed as well. Stabled horses were largely not requiring worming with worm counting every eight to ten weeks. Now all bets are off. We are finding much greater resistance and in groups of horses kept in the same place and with the same regime, a worm count will show a variation of 200 to 5000 if you can believe that. Advice from highly knowledgeable vets is contradictory. We worm foals from six weeks and then every six weeks with Ivomectin and then when yearlings we move to Equest Pramox. The mares are wormed with Equest Pramox on the day they foal and then are worm counted and target wormed and receive a five day Panacur once they are stabled in November. It is the best we can do but I want it better

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:34 Lynne
1:29
[Comment From MelMel: ] 

thanks a lot Lynne, if I may ask another question, what is your worming regime when it comes to foals? is fecal worm egg count to decide whether or not to worm suitable for them?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:29 Mel
1:28
Lynne: 

Hi Susan
Some foals are special in the first 24 hours. Farouche was not as she was very big but within three or four weeks she was fabulous. I think stalliions are to see when they are born but top sport horses may creep up on you. Is Farouche my favourite? Honestly, I love them all but adore Wavavoom and Wild Child.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:28 Lynne
1:26
[Comment From SusanSusan: ] 

Can you tell that a particular foal is something ‘special’? When did you know that Farouche was going to be as good as she has become? And is she your favourite?!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:26 Susan
1:26
H&H Carol: 

If you give Saracen a call and ask them about the Woodlander mix they will be able to help.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:26 H&H Carol
1:25
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

Thanks Lynne, I take it currently this is not a widely available feed?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:25 Guest
1:25
Lynne: 

Hello again Dawn
This is a great thread as I am an expat welsh person and lots of happy riders have welsh cobs and good thing too. I would not want to pick one or other stallion out from other places for this cross but for us both Wavavoom and Supertramp have done an outstanding job

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:25 Lynne
1:23
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 

Are there any stallions that catch your eye (yours or otherwise) that you feel would particularly suit a Section D mare? Mine is a lovely modern type by a Nebo stallion, but as you say, her weakness has been learning to “sit” in the canter – although judges always love her! I would be breeding the foal to keep and produce up the levels in dressage but would like to compliment her talent for jumping as well.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:23 Dawn
1:23
Lynne: 

Hi Lauren-Claire
We now have a specially developed feed for our youngstock made by Saracen. It still needs a little work for calories but it is very well supplemented and manages the confusion that people have about the difference between calories and nutrition. A “good doer” still needs vitamins, minerals and trace elements and if you read the bag of most feeds the optimum level of supplement only comes with feeding the full ration. Saracen have done loads to address this for us.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:23 Lynne
1:20
[Comment From Lauren-ClaireLauren-Claire: ] 

I have a rising 3yo, that I am hoping to back this year. What do you feed your youngsters to ensure they grow strong and level?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:20 Lauren-Claire
1:20
Lynne: 

Hi Mel,
What matters to me when I go to look at a possible stud is firstly the state of the fencing and pasture as this is a health and safety issue. Then I want to see that it is not overcrowded with too many horses for the staff to manage. I also want to know how they manage the first turn out of the visiting mare…is she just chucked in the field with the others? For me. “Gold Service” is a must with plenty of care and attention. I want her to come home better than she went.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:20 Lynne
1:17
[Comment From MelMel: ] 

Hi Lynne, when visiting a stud to send your mare or youngstock to, what are the key things to look for and questions to ask? thank you

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:17 Mel
1:17
Lynne: 

Hi Lauren
To breed a reserve champion is good going. Johnson is a good stallion and while the offspring of the cross maybe a bit heavy, they will be strong for working. What about just thinking of a son of Johnson with a litlle more blood. Or a stallion with similar lines. You are doing well.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:17 Lynne
1:16
[Comment From LaurenLauren: ] 

hi lynne – the reserve champ was by Johnson – we have bought the broodmare, just looking to get that ‘special mix’!!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:16 Lauren
1:15
Lynne: 

Hello Guest with foal due in April,

I don’t turn my very young foals out in the wind and rain. By six weeks I think they need to toughen up a bit but I then bring them in to recover. Of course, more native types can cope better. I would add that I don’t leave them out all day in scorching heat and sun either. I maybe would turn them out for an hour or so, or maybe just a leg stretch in the school. I think I once lost a foal who was left out too young in the herd and became rather challenged and then gave in to a virus.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:15 Lynne
1:14
[Comment From HannahHannah: ] 

Thanks Lynne, that’s great! Apologies, my post crossed with the above one re Welsh!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:14 Hannah
1:13
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

Hi Lynne, I am having my first foal due mid April this year. This is my first time and this may be a bit of a stupid question but with our wonderful british weather, what do you do in term of turn out? especially when the foal is very young? if the weather turns windy/rainy/cold, do you leave them in? do you ever rug the foal (or the mare?)

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:13 Guest
1:12
Lynne: 

It is so difficult to answer this type of question. The vets see no problems so the question is what sort of conformation issues? You have to know that heritability is quite low on most things but highest on feet.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:12 Lynne
1:10
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

If a mare doesn’t have perfect conformation, but vets see no issue with the mare, is it still ok to breed a foal intended to keep? Or is it best not to?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:10 Guest
1:09
Lynne: 

Hello Hannah
The native cross warmblood IS the day. They are the base of all german and dutch riding ponies. In my opinion, the mare needs to be native and the sire warmblood or small thoroughbred. For FEI, we want the ponies that are perfect small horses. Ridability is important bnut we do not need them to be first ridden types.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:09 Lynne
1:07
[Comment From HannahHannah: ] 

Do you think there is still a market for natives crossed with warmbloods as sports ponies, or are sports ponies such a specialism in their own right now that this ‘mix and match’ approach has had it’s day? Do you think it matters which way the cross goes, native mare or native stallion?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:07 Hannah
1:06
Lynne: 

Hello again Dawn

I love section Ds and had one myself that actually gwe took to the regionals. I thin temperament is great but for dressage they often lack the engagement necessary and therefore, particularly the canter. So they need the very best warmblood stallions not the local heroes.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:06 Lynne
1:04
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 

Hi Lynne, that’s very interesting about Welsh Section C mares. What are your views on using a Section D mare to produce a bigger horse? And do you find the temperament of the Welsh ponies mixes well with the Warmbloods, with the view of being ridden by an amateur?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:04 Dawn
1:02
Lynne: 

Hi Lauren
I remember Abraham as he stood in Wales. How was your reserve champion bred? Why not do something like that again?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:02 Lynne
1:01
[Comment From LaurenLauren: ] 

Hi Lynne, I have a Abraham x Don Jose mare, she is an old fashioned stamp of warmblood, she bred the 4yo reserve champion at this years nationals, what would you look to combine with her?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:01 Lauren
1:01
Lynne: 

G’day Dawn
I used welsh mares because I wanted to breed great British warmblood riding ponies and welsh mares form the basic gene pool of some of the best ponies in Europe. What I did do differently was to use Sec C mares who, in my opinion, have more body and perhaps scope. The results have given me everything ~I could have wished for.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 1:01 Lynne
12:59
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 

Hi Lynne, I notice you’ve been using Welsh-bred mares with some of your stallions. What do you like about adding native blood, and what do you think makes the Welsh/Warmblood mix work?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:59 Dawn
12:58
Lynne: 

Hello Louise
She took last year so should be no problem. Your choice of stallion, as I have replied to a previous questioner, should recognize that her type maybe old fashioned so maybe use a younger stallion. Jumpers have had to get quicker through the air. There is the thought that older mares are giving you, actually, old eggs where the DNA may not be so “sound”. I have found that most of the older mares that I breed from are just fine but throw the odd less good foal… but so do the young ones.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:58 Lynne
12:56
[Comment From LouiseLouise: ] 

Hi Lynne, I sent my 17yo show jumper away last year but unfortunatly after catching with twins (AI) she didn’t catch again. Id love to have another go this year as she’s a fit and athletic 18yo, but what do you think about breeding from older/maiden mares?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:56 Louise
12:55
[Comment From Nicky GreenNicky Green: ] 

This is really fascinating and so informative Thank you to Lynne for giving up her time to do this.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:55 Nicky Green
12:55
Lynne: 

Hello SYO7
What a great question. “modernising” means normally longer legs and with that often lighter of bone. In the end, if you make a horse that is naturally more capable of delivering the now greater requirement for power, suppleness and expression, that greater ability puts the ball in your court as the horse requires less “training” to gain these qualities. The important thing with a big moving horse is not to run it on full power all the time. There is no need and the horse will then last.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:55 Lynne
12:53
[Comment From JaneJane: ] 

Re Comment From Guest on giving the foal the best start – if you can, leave it to the professionals & keep it at somewhere like Woodlander which has my strong recommendation!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:53 Jane
12:52
[Comment From SY07SY07: ] 

Hi Lynne, what do you think the global direction of dressage breeding is? Horses used to be generally chunky and strong, but these days they are more refined and some of the Dutch ones look very breakable! How much movement can horses really cope with before they become unsuitable for sport and will we be having to use heavy horse crosses to bring back soundness?!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:52 SY07
12:51
[Comment From PollyPolly: ] 

Hi I am thinking of breeding from my mare but before I start I am trying to work out the cost excluding stud fee to get the foal to ridden age. I am a first time breeder and want to maker sure I am prepared. Thank you

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:51 Polly
 
H&H Carol: 

We did a feature on this very topic last spring. The costs might have changed a little, but it should give you a good idea. http://www.horseandhound.co…

  H&H Carol
12:51
Lynne: 

Hi Guest

The best start for a foal begins before it is born and you can never catch up on the nutrition that was needed pre birth. We hard feel all our mares for the last trimester but they have also received supplement during the period when they did not need hard feed. We also feed the mares for approx three months post foaling which normally coincides with the first trimester of the next pregnancy.
Post foaling we now treat all foals with Bowen or EMRT with a couple of wees of foaling to deal with any tightness or crookedness that may have resulted from a big foal lying awkwardly. Farriery starts, in general, at six weeks and then evry four to six weeks afterwards although some need attention every two weeks, If a foal is not straight in the front legs in the early days we limit its exercise until the chest widens. Finaly, we also check the mares milk and the igg levels in the foals blood and give plasma if borderline.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:51 Lynne
12:48
[Comment From GemmaGemma: ] 

OK great – thanks for that Lynne!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:48 Gemma
12:46
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

What are your best tips for giving a foal the best start and continuing to do so regarding nutrition, handling etc?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:46 Guest
12:45
Lynne: 

Hello Gemma
Life is full of surprises. You may not know what happened to your mare in her early life to account for her attitude and behaviour. I do think temperament is mostly strongly influenced by the mare, probably because of her early behaviour with the foal at foot. However, our experience tells us that sometimes the most difficult mares have produced the easiest children to ride. I would however not choose a stallion with obviously the same attitude as she shows. Some stallions and lines are known to be hot and stressy. Do your homework.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:45 Lynne
12:42
[Comment From GemmaGemma: ] 

Hi Lynne, My mare is a lovely mover and talented but she hasn’t been the easiest to train and even at nine years of age her temperament sometimes lets her down in the ring. Is it inevitable that her progeny will have the same temperament? I’ve heard that temperament tends to come from the dam rather than the sire.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:42 Gemma
12:42
Lynne: 

The final piece is temperament. A top horse will be a bit hot but should not be a headless chicken but rather a ridable horse that wants to work and learn and has endless energy for the highest levels of work. All three ingredients must be there.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:42 Lynne
12:41
Lynne: 

Second thing is paces. The highest level horses would not necessarily have the biggest trot but an excellent canter with a clear three beat and a good enough walk are a prerequisite. There needs to be power and suppleness and a round enough action in front to bring expression for those extra marks. Above all the paces must be engaged behind from nature.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:41 Lynne
12:39
Lynne: 

First thing for me is conformation. You need a horse with a well set neck, well proportioned with a good back end, well let down hocks. a well angled shoulder and limbs, and in particular hind leg angles and pasterns that will support soundness.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:39 Lynne
12:37
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

What would you look for when breeding a horse intended for dressage? Is the breed/type most important or all aspects of both sire and dam?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:37 Guest
12:36
Lynne: 

I think when I tell someone that I think that maybe they should not breed from their mare I just explain why nicely. I would say that there has to be a clear history to say “no”. If a mare has absolutely no breeding credentials I will advise not to breed but have only ever refused a couple of mares because mostly the offspring will be an improvement on the dam and so we go in the right direction, if they insist.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:36 Lynne
12:33
[Comment From SusanSusan: ] 

Do you have any advice about how to politely tell people they shouldn’t be breeding from their mares?! And how do you deal with nominations from mares with no breeding credentials for Woodlander stallions?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:33 Susan
12:32
Lynne: 

Hello again Ethel,

What a coincidence. we also have a Fidermark x Rubinstein mare but rather larger than yours. Her pedigree would certainly equip her as Fidermark was I think a World Champion or at least a Bundeschampion and Rubinstein is a renowned horse for ridability. I don’t find that these lines are always the strongest especially in canter for Rubinstein blood and the most successful sons of Rubinstein have tended to come from very substantial mothers. I would look at Donnerhall sons and maybe stallions like Lord Loxley with Weltmeyer blood. For us Weltmeyer blood has been very good with this mare as has Dimaggio. Go for it.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:32 Lynne
12:30
[Comment From Harriet MHarriet M: ] 

When is the ideal age to breed? I have a 6 year old mare who hasn’t done a lot so would like to get her out and about a bit before breeding from her. The foal would be to keep for myself to ride eventually. I’m a first time breeder so want to try and get it right!

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:30 Harriet M
 
H&H Carol: 

Hi Harriet. See Lynne’s reply to Kate re age of mares. That may answer your question. Carol

  H&H Carol
12:27
[Comment From Ethel EEthel E: ] 

She’s Fidermark lines on the sire and Rubinstein lines on the mother’s side. I’d like to breed something for at least small tour but that could also go for a good gallop on the beach (so good brain). Her sire was on the verge of GP when he died but was schooling all the movements. I don’t mind about size really as I am happy on a 15.2hh or a 17hh…

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:27 Ethel E
12:26
Lynne: 

Hello Kate,
No, probably fine. Age is not an absolute showstopper for a mare although most mares are at their breeding peak between about 6 and 13 or 14. Some times with age the uterus may have more scar tissue if the mare has drawn in air and bacteria; sometimes these mares are more sensitive to extender which makes both despatched chilled and frozen semen more difficult. Most of them are just fine and we regularly breed with mares up to the age of 20 and above, but I tend to go for a young stallion for reasons of type where an older mare bred 15 years ago will have been maybe modern in her time but may need some updating for modern sport.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:26 Lynne
12:23
[Comment From KateKate: ] 

My mare is 14 and has not had a foal before — is it too late for me to breed from her?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:23 Kate
12:22
Lynne: 

Hi Ethel
Can I refer you to my reply to the first time breeder? What are you wanting to breed and for what purpose? Do you want to compete in dressage above Advanced Medium? Have you checked out the pedigree to see what has come from the dam line? Do the stallions in her pedigree have dressage “form”. Do you want the same size of horse for you to ride? Can I have more info before advice please?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:22 Lynne
12:20
[Comment From Ethel EEthel E: ] 

Hi Lynne, I have a small mare (15.2hh) and she competes in dressage (elementary, working adv med at home). I’d like a long-lined stallion with a good topline but am wondering whether she’s actually good enough to breed from in the first place? She’s well bred and a great horse, but how do I decide if she’s good enough to breed from?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:20 Ethel E
12:20
Lynne: 

Hi Millie,

It depends on your circumstances and whether the mare has had foals before with no problems in foaling or post foaling with the foal. In my opinion it is insanity to leave a mare out in the field to foal (unless perhaps a native where they are still in their naturalish form) when you have spent lots of time and money getting the pregnancy and you could lose a foal just because the bag does not break and the foal drowns. So you need to have the facility to keep her in a stable, at least for the night but you also need to be watching her in the latter stages. At Woodlander, our mares and our visitors are under camera from four weeks before due date and are watched 24/7. You need to have the time to do this and you have to have a user friendly vet on call when you lose your nerve and think something is going wrong. Most mares foal perfectly well without any help for foaling itself but the odd one does need a gentle pull with the contractions if she gets tired and we always would break the sac but not until after the shoulders are out. Simple stuff for us but can be scary for a home alone first timer.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:20 Lynne
12:14
[Comment From MillieMillie: ] 

Do you think it’s realistic for a first-time breeder to keep a mare at home, or should you send her away to foal?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:14 Millie
12:13
H&H Carol: 

Lots of questions coming in now. Please bear with us and we will get around to you all in turn. Please don’t repost your questions as it slows things down.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:13 H&H Carol
12:13
Lynne: 

They should find out as much about their mare as they can. Firstly, they should take the mare for grading or to someone who will give them an honest opinion about the conformation, type and movement of the mare. Then, critically, do your research on both parents…what did they look like, what were their strengths, what were their conformation issues. You need to do this as however your mare looks, it is the whole genetic heritage behind with which you will be breeding so you really need to check that out and how well it fits with what you will want to do with your homebred when you come to ride it. Honestly, if things do not check out to a good quality…it is better to keep your mare in the field and not to breed with her…just love her and hug her…she will not mind.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:13 Lynne
12:10
H&H Carol: 

Lets say the breeder has a mare they love and intends to keep the foal for themselves. What should they consider?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:10 H&H Carol
12:09
Lynne: 

For a first time breeder the most important thing is to have a strategy for your breeding. Are you breeding to sell? breeding for you to ride? wanting to sell as a foal? or breeding just because you love the mare you have and want a job for her?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:09 Lynne
12:07
H&H Carol: 

For a first-time breeder, what are the most important things they need to consider?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:07 H&H Carol
12:07
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

Hi Lynne,

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:07 Guest
12:06
Lynne: 

Hi Sarah Jane,
Your mare looks lovely and has a very convincing jumping pedigree with Voltaire and Emillion in her lines. In general, I believe for the highest levels of eventing you need to be sure that you compliment the great warmblood jumping blood with some thoroughbred. When you look at a horse in rankings, always look to see the type of mares that have produced the successful offspring.

Ricardo Z looks to be another good jumping pedigree and is high in the world rankings. So check out what he crosses well with but also go on a search for a top thoroughbred or thoroubred cross stallion. Good Luck.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:06 Lynne
12:03
H&H Carol: 

Let’s kick off with a question we had posed earlier today by Sarah-Jane Brown ‏@Shoestringevent on twitter.

#asklynne I am a first-time breeder. I have decided to breed from my retired adv eventer http://shoestringeventing.c… Unsure what stallion to use, poss Ricardo Z? Mare lacks a bit of stride, maybe substance and scope for top level. Idea is for me to jump / event so temperament v important. What do you think?

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:03 H&H Carol
12:01
Lynne: 

Hello to everyone out there.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:01 Lynne
12:00
H&H Carol: 

Welcome to our live breeding chat. I am delighted to have with me Lynne Crowden, the brainchild behind the Woodlander Stud.

Tuesday March 25, 2014 12:00 H&H Carol