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  1. #1

    Default Trot or canter into fences?

    At what point are you ready to canter into show jumping fences when schooling? I know it’s a basic question but you know me, I never mind sounding a total numpty....

    Obviously I can see the reasons for approaching in trot - gives the horse time to look at the fence, more controlled, easier to keep the horse straight etc. But I hate it and much prefer jumping in canter.

    After his schooling sessions with pro-eventer Jensen is great jumping - he locks onto the fence, never hesitates and enjoys himself hugely. So am I OK to jump him in canter when schooling?
    So many instructors have told me to always approach in trot I feel guilty cantering!
    Three greyhounds are not enough..... I miss you so much Islay greyhound, always the most beautiful girl in the world

  2. #2

    Default Re: Trot or canter into fences?

    I'm rubbish at jumping but when I feel bad about not jumping my former HOYS WH and decide to have a go for his sake, I always go out of canter!! Hate jumping out of trot, you are much more likely to get thrown out of balance, get big jump. Really a jump is just an elevated canter stride anyway!With less 'point and shoot' horses than my own, I have been known to trot a certain way, then ask for canter quite close to the jump so I can keep the canter balanced. But in general, I think it's easier to jump out of canter once you are competent in the canter-and neckstraps can be a life saver.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Trot or canter into fences?

    As long as you have control of the canter I would be working on jumping from that, I usually do a lot of gridwork where we approach in trot and canter through the line so the rider and horse gets a really good feel for striding and distance, I don't do an awful lot of individual fences before getting them out competing/ CR as long as they are confident with fillers and will jump out of trot or canter a simple course should be easy enough to negotiate and will be a good step forward.

    Once they have the basics in place I like to work on stride patterns , distances and turns almost all in a decent canter, at the end of the day they need to be in a strong canter to jump xc and too much time jumping out of trot can have a negative impact on both rider and horse, it may be you need to try and stick with the same instructor who will give you more continuity, I would normally keep to trot if I didn't know the rider and build up to canter work once I had more idea of their ability.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Trot or canter into fences?

    Ah sorry I meant instructors over many years rather than instructors with current horse Be Positive

    Thank you that is really helpful, I will try and book some more grid work sessions as I know they are beneficial but are obviously impossible to do on my own! Jensen's canter is still a bit of a work in progress (although massively improved on how it was) so I think canter work for jumping will be helpful for him
    Three greyhounds are not enough..... I miss you so much Islay greyhound, always the most beautiful girl in the world

  5. #5
    Schoolmaster iknowmyvalue's Avatar
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    Default Re: Trot or canter into fences?

    Trot is useful for horses that tend to rush and throw themselves flat over the fence in canter, because from trot they actually have to sit back and use themselves properly, especially if you're jumping a bigger fence. Like you, I really hate the feeling jumping from trot, but I do see the benefits. I'm also a great fan of only cantering a few strides out on a horse that rushes or has a tendency to get unbalanced and flat in the canter.

    I'm always surprised how big horses can jump out of trot when they're actually using themselves properly! I've jumped up to 1m from trot, albeit unintentionally! Also for eventing it's always useful to be able to jump out of trot, because you never know what's going to happen out on the XC course!

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  6. #6
    Old nag ycbm's Avatar
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    Default Re: Trot or canter into fences?

    I hate trotting into fences and it isn't something you would normally want the horse to do when it's more experienced, so I avoid it whenever possible !

    I think the potential benefits to the horse are outweighed by the fact that from trot there is no easy way for it to bring both hind legs under together to take off from, so it can all feel very ungainly.
    Small Print: The view expressed in this post is my own. You should take no action on any opinion given without verifying the facts for yourself. Like all humans,I can be wrong. Polite correction is welcomed.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Trot or canter into fences?

    Quote Originally Posted by ycbm View Post
    I hate trotting into fences and it isn't something you would normally want the horse to do when it's more experienced, so I avoid it whenever possible !

    I think the potential benefits to the horse are outweighed by the fact that from trot there is no easy way for it to bring both hind legs under together to take off from, so it can all feel very ungainly.
    This. I find it such an uncomfortable motion I avoid.

  8. #8
    Probably skiving milliepops's Avatar
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    Default Re: Trot or canter into fences?

    Quote Originally Posted by iknowmyvalue View Post
    Trot is useful for horses that tend to rush and throw themselves flat over the fence in canter, because from trot they actually have to sit back and use themselves properly, especially if you're jumping a bigger fence. Like you, I really hate the feeling jumping from trot, but I do see the benefits. I'm also a great fan of only cantering a few strides out on a horse that rushes or has a tendency to get unbalanced and flat in the canter.

    I'm always surprised how big horses can jump out of trot when they're actually using themselves properly! I've jumped up to 1m from trot, albeit unintentionally! Also for eventing it's always useful to be able to jump out of trot, because you never know what's going to happen out on the XC course!
    Agreed, I used to train with Matt Ryan when I was eventing and because both me and Millie used to love to go on long ones, we were always made to jump in trot to begin with so we would get a bit closer to the fence and she would make a better shape. You can't really miss a stride coming from trot though it is a bit alarming to trot down to a big fence and trust the horse to sort itself out

    I tend to approach grids in trot for that reason, it got us into the right spot rather than starting with a yee-haa moment

  9. #9

    Default Re: Trot or canter into fences?

    I do recall Lucinda Green at a clinic making us all jump XC fences out of walk - that was scary
    Three greyhounds are not enough..... I miss you so much Islay greyhound, always the most beautiful girl in the world

  10. #10

    Default Re: Trot or canter into fences?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lévrier View Post
    I do recall Lucinda Green at a clinic making us all jump XC fences out of walk - that was scary
    She does this at almost all her clinics apparently!

    On to the original question though - trotting with a placing pole is useful in the sense that it helps the horse gain confidence by always placing them at the right spot and helping them to get close to the fence.

    But, I can't see any reason whatsoever for you to feel guilty for canrering fences? That is how he would jump in any sort of show situation and its far from unnatural for horses. So go ahead and jump in canter! As long as you have control of the canter I don't see why you wouldn't

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