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  1. #11

    Default Re: To buy, or not to buy - That is the quesiton

    Which is where the divide is coming in.... There's no way my daughter will be loaning in winter, regardless whether i bought or not. She enjoyed it, dont get me wrong, but there were occassions when it was wet and miserable and she just didnt want to go. She loves riding, but I'm not going to force it. I said to her dad we would see how she did in the summer with the weather, and in winter she can just stick with lessons.

    If we bought, she would still ride, she would have her 2 weekly lessons regardless what happens and I would buy something that she would eventually be able to ride (when she's grown that is)

    I fund horse riding by myself. Her dad has said this morning that he will pay for her loan if I can't afford it but I don't want to rely on him for this so I'm trying not to but looking at figures, it's unlikely I can do both unless I cut other things down (for example, she gets £40 a month pocket money, goes swimming etc - She would need to stop all of that)

  2. #12

    Default Re: To buy, or not to buy - That is the quesiton

    Well you know your daughter and how enthusiastic (or not!) she actually is so this is a decision only you can make. I don't really understand the reluctance in letting her dad pay for a loan pony though. There may, of course, be legitimate reasons why you want to proceed with caution. Again only you know the circumstances so I am not sure how anyone else can help with the decision really.

  3. #13

    Default Re: To buy, or not to buy - That is the quesiton

    Her dad and me aren't together and whilst he says he will pay, there's always the chance he wont. I'm very much independent and I don't like to rely on anyone for money.

    DD will always ride, no matter what. She hasn't ridden any more this winter really than what she would ride in her lessons. I think in the summer she will ride more on a loan (as she will be more likely to want to hack out etc where as with winter, she wasn't able to due to the dark nights)

    I appreciate that ultimately it'll be me that needs to bite the bullet and make a decision, and I am leaning more towards the loan, but I think buying is something I will end up needing to be persuaded into - the same as i did with the loan. I had the exact same worries with the loan as I have now, the reason i finally went for it was because i knew if it went wrong, I could back out. I don't have that safety net with buying which is why I think I am more reluctant about it.

    I'm probably more sounding off than anything here, I just want to get everything clear so i know what to do, but also, when. I don't want to rush into buying for the sake of it, esp if the loan would work better. I think I was more looking for validation of what to do, but I appreciate that its hard to do over t'net without knowing the ins and outs but as the RS are selling, I didn't want to ask them (knowing they would push for the sale) - the people I have around me who I've spoken to are all mixed between buy/loan hence the post here

  4. #14
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    Default Re: To buy, or not to buy - That is the quesiton

    If you loan for your daughter does she have access to the lessons as part of the deal? My old RS did similar, two rides a week including the lessons.

    As a suggestion if you are thinking of buying I do wonder whether it might be helpful for you to do a couple of weeks of 'care' as you would your own and check that you and your daughter can manage that around her activities? As it is just you presumably daughter would have to accompany you for a fair amount of the care side?

    Of course if you do buy, so long as it is a sensible purchase you can still back out, you can sell .

    Re. purchasing from the RS, there have been a fair few incidences on here of novice rider owners really being screwed over by their riding school while they thought they were buying something from a source that had their best interests at heart, hence the responses of warning on that front as it is not nice to hear about.

  5. #15

    Default Re: To buy, or not to buy - That is the quesiton

    Lessons are half price if you loan. Any other activity though (for example, if they have a show jumping competition) is still full price

    If I was to own, the days I would need to attend are Mon, Thurs, Fri, Sat, Sun. Currently the only day we are not there anyway is a Mon, and io don't work that day so could go whilst she's at school so it wouldn't affect her schedule. Her dad takes her to her swimming lessons - he has her Tues & Wed when I work "late" (which if I bought, would be the 2 days that I would use the part livery facility) the only day that I need to take her anywhere to guides, but this isn't until 7:30pm at night so we usually go to the stable beforehand straight from school.

    See that's the thing with anything really isn't it, you never quite know who is looking out for you..... I don't believe the RS would turn me over but I know that doesn't mean she wont! But if I was at the point where I was considering definitely buying from YO, I would ask my cousin to come and give me their opinion too (as well as some of the friends I've made at the yard). I wouldn't buy based solely on the YO - I know she's going to turn a profit no matter what, business is business after all.

  6. #16
    Not slacking-multitasking
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    Default Re: To buy, or not to buy - That is the quesiton

    so on a monday if you did the horse while she was at school someone else would check the horse for your/give later hay/feed etc?

    I only asked that because I have seen horsey kids totally put off by having to go and care for their Mum's horse on a daily basis that they aren't allowed to ride themselves, and it always seems really sad to me that having once been keen they then get a bit grumpy and fed up with it.

    I'm certainly not suggsting your RS would screw you over, but more suggesting why the sort of scenario you mentioned in your OP would get alarm bells ringing with quite a lot of long term posters, hence the responses.

    I'm inclined to say wait until daughter is approaching teen years and see if she is still interested then, as that is often crunch time and quite a few drop out, as such if she did that might be the time to purchase one.

  7. #17

    Default Re: To buy, or not to buy - That is the quesiton

    Quote Originally Posted by ester View Post
    so on a monday if you did the horse while she was at school someone else would check the horse for your/give later hay/feed etc?

    I only asked that because I have seen horsey kids totally put off by having to go and care for their Mum's horse on a daily basis that they aren't allowed to ride themselves, and it always seems really sad to me that having once been keen they then get a bit grumpy and fed up with it.

    I'm certainly not suggsting your RS would screw you over, but more suggesting why the sort of scenario you mentioned in your OP would get alarm bells ringing with quite a lot of long term posters, hence the responses.

    I'm inclined to say wait until daughter is approaching teen years and see if she is still interested then, as that is often crunch time and quite a few drop out, as such if she did that might be the time to purchase one.
    Well in the winter the routine at the RS is that it will be in the field and would be checked on by me. In the summer the horses are in the field behind the RS so i would need to go and bring in, do jobs, ride etc then turn out again - they are then checked in the evening by the RS.

    My daughter has quite a few friends at the stables. When i loaned last year (and she wasnt able to ride the horse) she often disappeared to hang out with her friends (and oddly... help them!!!) so she wouldnt be bored there... maybe as she got older but then she might be at an age where she can be left at home.

    Even if i waited until shes a teen - the ownership would be for me, not her. She would obviously be able to ride it, if she wanted. But ultimately, it would be my horse. The only reason shes a factor is because I can't afford to keep her loan pony if i bought, but as mentioned, she is only loaning in the summer anyway and will continue lessons regardless

  8. #18
    Not slacking-multitasking
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    Default Re: To buy, or not to buy - That is the quesiton

    Ah sorry, I forgot they were out until midweek (that is really bizarre!)

    I meant wait until she was a teen as more likely give it up than carry on at that point!

    Fwiw I did always feel bad that my mum had totally given up her riding so that me and my sister could. But once everyone was old enough to pay for their own we bought a couple and had the ride between us depending on who was closer to home at the time. That was 13 years ago and she has definitely fitted in everything she might have wanted to do while we were growing up.

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