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  1. #1
    Sport horse Celestica's Avatar
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    Apr 2011
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    Dublin
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    249

    Default Transitioning from RS to riding on your own

    Hi guys,

    I've been riding for many years and recently returned from a couple years out of the saddle.

    I've finally the time and money to keep a share on a horse, however I'm struggling with the transition of riding school to own riding. I'm hoping to get lessons soon but the yard instructor is booked out, I have some schooling books but for the moment I'm not too sure what to be working on.

    At the moment I'm working through stuff I usually would have in my 1 hour group lesson but finding that's only taking me 15 mins of riding really. Can anyone offer some advice?

  2. #2
    Old nag equi's Avatar
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    Oct 2010
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    Northern Ireland
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    Default Re: Transitioning from RS to riding on your own

    It can take a while cause you are so used to being told what to do, and then run through all that in your head and its done. I would say have a clock and set yourself goals...for example i generally only ride for about 45mins most days - so 10mins warm up in walk going on each rein, practicing halts and leg yields and circles and stretching down and out. 15-20mins working on my walk > trot > walk etc to get them on the leg, and trotting in circles and serpentines, and really focusing on paces so collecting along the short and elongating along the long..really focus on balance and corners. 10-15mins working on canter again circles and balance/corners. The rest is walking cool down, really working on stretching out and walking forward. Usually if i want to put in poles they just work into whatever im doing anyway and i pretend they are not actually there. For jumping i would be doing all the above but in shorter increments then jumping whatever i am jumping. Warm up and cool down are the most important parts though to me.

    Break all this up by the way by just walking about now and then. When you think abut a group lesson think about how much time you spend walking around while one horse does something, or how long you spend standing in the middle/corner while one jumps etc lol thats where the time goes!
    Last edited by equi; 27-11-17 at 07:11 PM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Transitioning from RS to riding on your own

    Also, when it isn't a lesson, you don't *have* to work - you *can* (assuming you/horse are confident doing so) just go for a lovely relaxing hack. Enjoy :-)
    Last edited by GirlFriday; 27-11-17 at 09:46 PM. Reason: wobbly spelling

  4. #4
    Old nag equi's Avatar
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    Oct 2010
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    Northern Ireland
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    Default Re: Transitioning from RS to riding on your own

    Quote Originally Posted by GirlFriday View Post
    Also, when it isn't a lesson, you don't *have* to work - you *can* (assuming you/horse are confident doing so) just go for a lovely relaxing hack. Enjoy :-)
    And if you don't hack you can still just walk about working on stretches and relaxation! I often have stretch days.

  5. #5
    Old nag
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,470

    Default Re: Transitioning from RS to riding on your own

    It can be really hard making that transition as you don't have the experience to know what to do with your time - or how long to do it for! Have a look at books like 101 schooling exercises. Putting a "schooling playlist" on your phone can help. Set out 5 mins of one type, 5 of another etc so you know when it is time to change by the change in music. One set for warm up, one set for trot work etc. Decide what you want to work on before you get to the stables - but always have a "plan B" in case one of you isn't really on the plan that day.

    Don't loose heart - everyone goes through this.

  6. #6
    Old nag
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    the North
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    5,241

    Default Re: Transitioning from RS to riding on your own

    Bear in mind the horses fitness level too when planning your session. Some people get sharers because they've little time to ride themselves, so the horse could have been doing very little until you started sharing it and need the fitness building up gradually.

    To school the horse effectively you need to be able to recognize where he needs improvement, so think about that as a starting point. Then use your books and your own knowledge to plan some exercises designed to improve these weak points. Every session needs a warm up period, a work period with breaks and a cool down period. The aim of every schooling session is to see some improvement compared to what you started with in the beginning. Sometimes you need to adjust or abandon your plans to work on whatever problems the horse is presenting you with that day.

    It's not all about the horse either. If you've got some bad habits or weak points as a rider you might choose to work on those instead.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Transitioning from RS to riding on your own

    Remember that schooling sessions don't have to be an hour! I usually do around 20-30 mins in the school. Hacks can obviously be much longer so you get the fitness there and schooling is suppleness etc.

  8. #8
    Veteran FestiveFuzz's Avatar
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    Jan 2008
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    Surrey
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    Default Re: Transitioning from RS to riding on your own

    I really liked using this CD to help give structure to my schooling sessions - http://clairelilley.com/shop/cds/rid...ire-lilley-cd/

  9. #9
    Veteran alainax's Avatar
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    Apr 2010
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    Lanarkshire
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    Default Re: Transitioning from RS to riding on your own

    Often a lot of a group lesson is taken up by waiting your turn for things, so it's natural that you get through it quicker. I found it took a loooong time to get out of the walk for 10 mins, trot for a while, canter a bit, jumps the end thing like at riding schools. Try and set your self mini goals, and looks at the details too. Like doing a session working on downwards transitions and straight lines.! As long as you properly warm up and cool down, there's no need to stick to a set order. I'll often go for a canter first and then get back to the slower stuff. When you start getting into the real nitty gritty of trying to make improvements, I now find we run out of stamina before ideas!
    Last edited by alainax; 28-11-17 at 09:30 PM.

  10. #10
    Sport horse JDH01's Avatar
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    Jan 2013
    Location
    Derbyshire
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    262

    Default Re: Transitioning from RS to riding on your own

    I am another one for the hack out, enjoy and build a relationship school of thought. I have ridden since 2.5 now 56.5. Owned my own horse/s 20 yrs. if a young horse intensive lessons but still on my latest once a week, weather permitting! Had him a year and he was green, I school on hacks though. Not sure this will help but it is reality!

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