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  1. #1

    Default Jumping corners - I have a cunning plan....

    But as its just the theory of someone who knows little about cross country riding - I'd love to hear other people's thoughts on my plan

    I HATE corners. They give me the heebie jeebies. And I have to jump one in the 90 at Calmsden tomorrow which comes far too early in the course for me with the corner demons, so naturally I am musing on the internet instead of cleaning my boots Also, I've never actually had a problem with one in competition, its all in my head, so I may be making something out of nothing here.

    I know the usual advice re picking a line @ right angles - looking for a spot etc. But I've never heard discussion of what lead leg you should be on (and for any other angled fence too I suppose). If I take the example of a corner with the pointy bit on the right, I have this idea that on a horse that might be tempted to duck out right it'd help to be in a left lead canter. If the horse isn't thinking of jumping and therefore doesn't put both back legs down together, it is harder for them to push right if the first back leg on the ground is also the right one. It might be entirely "placebo" effect, but I think it might feel more secure. Like if I was running and wanted to suddenly jump right, I'd push off from my left leg.

    But, I also have a counter argument to myself. As it takes a bit of time in the jump for the front legs to become "level", as the horse takes off the outside front leg (the right in my example) gets higher faster, ... and in my scenario above, the slower left lead leg would still potentially be coming up as it meets the wide bit of the corner, which is inherently close to you when you're forced to jump on an angle. Which would make you more likely to hit the fence (I know this is super techy) with that leg. I doubt it would matter for my level - but I have a dangly pony who's tipped me up before, so reason to consider it! I make every effort to be a straight as possible for everything else for this reason.

    For tomorrow, I'll just sit up and kick I also think that this is a very minor point compared to having the right line, right canter, and right attitude. But because I'm a nerd, I'd be fascinated if anyone who knows about xc riding/has discussed this with someone who knows about xc/just has a brain and likes a debate has any views?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Jumping corners - I have a cunning plan....

    Logic dictates the idea of left canter to a right handed point minimises the chances of a run out but I don't think I would be fretting too much about it on the approach

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Jumping corners - I have a cunning plan....

    good luck for tomorrow.

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    Default Re: Jumping corners - I have a cunning plan....

    I think you are over thinking this now. In a 90 and with a young horse you can easily just take it near the end, and line up perfectly with the leading edge, the horse will naturally clear the angled back rail, and even if he were to hit it will be less likely to fall than if he hit an angled front rail.

    In answer to your question, IME an inexperienced horse is much more likely to fall out through the shoulder to run out, so I would have the leading leg to the pointy bit if I wanted to be picking hairs. But, for a 90, I would just have a good contained canter, keep rein contact to keep the shoulders straight, look straight ahead, and jump it at the pointy corner end as if it were a spread. You won't even notice the back rail.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Jumping corners - I have a cunning plan....

    Thank you very much Mike! I'm looking forward to it

    Very good point on the falling out. Hadn't really considered it as my boy tends not to very much. But I think on a young horse that was quite green you're right that would be a real temptation. I also tend not to jump the leading edge straight on (I don't know why) - but jump what would be the bisecting line at a right angle. Will have a think about that when I walk my courses thank you. I know I'm also overthinking - not really going to be something I'm worrying about when I'm actually approaching the thing, but I'm curious as to what the technical ideal would be.
    Last edited by hazza_s; 07-10-17 at 08:55 PM.

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    Default Re: Jumping corners - I have a cunning plan....

    Quote Originally Posted by hazza_s View Post
    Thank you very much Mike! I'm looking forward to it

    Very good point on the falling out. Hadn't really considered it as my boy tends not to very much. But I think on a young horse that was quite green you're right that would be a real temptation. I also tend not to jump the leading edge straight on (I don't know why) - but jump what would be the bisecting line at a right angle. Will have a think about that when I walk my courses thank you. I know I'm also overthinking - not really going to be something I'm worrying about when I'm actually approaching the thing, but I'm curious as to what the technical ideal would be.
    The technically correct thing IS to jump the bisecting line, and with bigger fences you would have to do that, because not only would the fence be higher, the spread would be wider too, as the angle would be more acute.

    At a 90 competition though the spreads are correspondingly narrower, and so with younger horse that *may* consider running out it is perfectly possible to jump the leading edge straight at the pointy end, which make as run out less inviting. As you gain experience I would then angle the jump to prepare for when they are bigger.

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    Default Re: Jumping corners - I have a cunning plan....

    WHAT,NO UPDATE.How did it go on the day ? I hope all went well ,but even if there were some hiccups it doesnt matter . Tell all please.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Jumping corners - I have a cunning plan....

    Yes, update please, I hope it went well.

    I would not be worrying about what leg you are on going forward, but I would be building lots and lots of corners out of showjumps at home, make them easy and once you get confident change the line you ride, use shorter poles, makes them wider etc. Always use a spare wing or something to stop to drifting to a bit that is too wide.

    I use to hate corners too but lots of this worked for me!

  9. #9

    Default Re: Jumping corners - I have a cunning plan....

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike007 View Post
    WHAT,NO UPDATE.How did it go on the day ? I hope all went well ,but even if there were some hiccups it doesnt matter . Tell all please.
    Whoops sorry! I'm being negligent I had a lovely day. Bit of an average dressage - I thought it was a nice test and he normally gets a pretty good mark for dressage but judge wasn't a fan for some reason. Hey ho, nothing really went wrong and I have my own ideas about what we need to improve. It was probably a good thing because my delightful horse was SO happy to be jumping he then carted me round the next two phases! He was squealing when I went into canter and capering round in every direction on whatever leg he fancied. He's not the most careful jumper and I'm not John Whittaker so I got a little deep to a couple - he happily tanked me into the bottom and took the top off. I'm not sure he was even looking at them. And then stormed round the xc - corner felt easy. Jumped it fairly straight and he barely wobbled. I pretty much sat and steered with the handbrake half on the whole way round. Its hard not to have a nice time sitting on a pony thats clearly having the time of its life! And its the first time I've ever really felt a 90 xc was verging on "easy" so a good day all round. Thanks for asking

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