Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27

Thread: Bum swinging

  1. #11
    Old nag fburton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Glasgow
    Posts
    6,912

    Default Re: Bum swinging

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparemare View Post
    He's moving your feet rather than you moving his.
    This sounds like what the Natural Horsemanship folks talk about.

    Okay, so f we assume that it really is about dominance (which I personally don't believe), how is the remedy - i.e. how we deal with the behaviour - different from if it's just unwanted behaviour that the horse hasn't yet learned not to do?

    As I said, I think how you advised dealing with the behaviour in your first post hit the nail on the head. It is just the explanation for why it arose that I am questioning.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Bum swinging

    Quote Originally Posted by fburton View Post
    This sounds like what the Natural Horsemanship folks talk about.

    Okay, so f we assume that it really is about dominance (which I personally don't believe), how is the remedy - i.e. how we deal with the behaviour - different from if it's just unwanted behaviour that the horse hasn't yet learned not to do?

    As I said, I think how you advised dealing with the behaviour in your first post hit the nail on the head. It is just the explanation for why it arose that I am questioning.
    I don't think the remedy is any different tbh. And it's impossible to say whether it is dominance or not without seeing the horse in question, some are just big lumbering lumps that don't know how big they are and it hasn't been made important enough for them to be aware of where their handler is

    Others, I think, do clearly have some intent (ETA and I would consider the current example at my yard as one of these) - I think you need to see the horse in action to judge which it is. Other body language is probably the best indicator, ears/eyes/tail/posture etc are all giveaways as to whether it's innocent bumbling or motivated by a dominant streak.

    But for speed of response, I don't think it's a negative to consider that there may be an element of dominance under the surface or the potential for one to develop provided the handler doesn't then take the decision to be aggressive or OTT in their response, when, as someone else mentioned you can be quite passive in your resistance provided the timing is perfect.

  3. #13
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    1,480

    Default Re: Bum swinging

    Quote Originally Posted by beginner_rider View Post
    I agree with what others have said, does he lift a leg or try to kick? Regardless, do be careful if youre going to poke him in the bum! Maybe start with something a bit longer than a hoof pick in case he takes offense! At nearly 7 I would be expecting decent manners from a horse, so annoying when they pick up bad habits - my 16 year olds new favourite trick is biting and the little sod just keeps going!
    He doesn't raise a leg or threaten to kick, I don't think it's an aggressive move on his part, just bad manners/testing me/he doesn't know better and I haven't told him to do otherwise (that has registered in his brain). He's a clever boy and learns quickly, he's pb Welsh and his brain can be both an advantage and a disadvantage!

  4. #14
    Old nag
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    W. Yorks
    Posts
    15,534

    Default Re: Bum swinging

    I find that a poke into the hollow just behind the ribs, in front of the hips, with either a thumb or an elbow works well for this kind of squashing. Alternatively, if you can read his body language and react quickly, from the side that he is threatening to move to, before he has shifted his weight, just put your hand on his quarters, at the side, and say 'over' firmly, to move him in the opposite direction to that which he intended.
    "Don't LET him do that"

  5. #15

    Default Re: Bum swinging

    Quote Originally Posted by LHIS View Post
    He's a clever boy and learns quickly, he's pb Welsh and his brain can be both an advantage and a disadvantage!
    ahh, the fabulous Welsh 'brain'. Funny how they have a reputation, isn't it?! Mine was a bit bolshy about personal space to start with but is pretty good at remembering her manners these days. I'm now safe to invite her for a cuddle without her forgetting how to be polite . Be consistent and be quick to react, and you'll have it sorted in no time

  6. #16
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    1,480

    Default Re: Bum swinging

    Thank you all - I will give him a sharp prod when he does this next (almost certainly tomorrow!) and I'll see what he does. Will report back!

  7. #17
    Old nag Tnavas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Zealand but from UK
    Posts
    8,394

    Default Re: Bum swinging

    Totally agree with millipops in general - HOWEVER my young horse would do this a he was actually in pain from his neck being out of alignment - he fidgeted all the time he was tied up, you would go to put the saddle on and he would disappear to one side - it was his way of telling me he was uncomfortable - so I suggest that as this is a recent new behaviour do all the usual health checks - teeth, saddle, maybe have him checked over by a chiro.
    Ride a Clydesdale it makes your butt look small!

  8. #18
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    1,480

    Default Re: Bum swinging

    Quote Originally Posted by Tnavas View Post
    Totally agree with millipops in general - HOWEVER my young horse would do this a he was actually in pain from his neck being out of alignment - he fidgeted all the time he was tied up, you would go to put the saddle on and he would disappear to one side - it was his way of telling me he was uncomfortable - so I suggest that as this is a recent new behaviour do all the usual health checks - teeth, saddle, maybe have him checked over by a chiro.
    Thank you - he's had all of this recently and I have his back checked regularly by the chiropractor. I'm lucky in that my YO is also a saddle fitter of my particular type of saddle. He had his teeth done a few weeks ago and all good.

  9. #19
    Old nag
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    14,840

    Default Re: Bum swinging

    I agree it's bad manners but it can escalate quite quickly once he realises you'll get out of his way. I'd definitely be giving him a sharp prod or even using something like the bristly end of the broom so it's more of an uncomfortable shock.

    Hopefully he'll learn pretty quickly that he can't walk all over you!

  10. #20
    Old nag fburton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Glasgow
    Posts
    6,912

    Default Re: Bum swinging

    Quote Originally Posted by milliepops View Post
    I don't think the remedy is any different tbh. And it's impossible to say whether it is dominance or not without seeing the horse in question, some are just big lumbering lumps that don't know how big they are and it hasn't been made important enough for them to be aware of where their handler is

    Others, I think, do clearly have some intent (ETA and I would consider the current example at my yard as one of these) - I think you need to see the horse in action to judge which it is. Other body language is probably the best indicator, ears/eyes/tail/posture etc are all giveaways as to whether it's innocent bumbling or motivated by a dominant streak.

    But for speed of response, I don't think it's a negative to consider that there may be an element of dominance under the surface or the potential for one to develop provided the handler doesn't then take the decision to be aggressive or OTT in their response, when, as someone else mentioned you can be quite passive in your resistance provided the timing is perfect.
    I agree with most of what you said, apart from the implied assumption that if the behaviour isn't "innocent bumbling" (great phrase - I like it!) it must be related to dominance. Please correct me if that's not what you meant! Assuming the bum swinging is intentional behaviour directed towards the handler, it could be aggressive - or not, e.g. if the horse wanted you to scratch his bum - though that kind of behaviour is more likely learned rather than offered out of the blue. Either way, it's unwanted. If it is aggressive, dominance is one explanation, but I would think it a less likely one unless the owner had inadvertently got into a competitive situation by e.g. chasing the horse off his feed. It could be the horse is afraid of something and is being pro-actively aggressive and swinging his bum to (as he sees it) protect himself, though you'd also expect some kind of kick threat too in that situation. As you say, you'd need to see the horse in action and look for clues in the body language.

    That said LHIS's original description sounds very familiar - it's a behaviour I suspect we have all seen before at some point. I'd be interested to hear if the sharp poke (without getting cross or shouty) stopped the behaviour for OP.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Find Horses For Sale