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  1. #1
    Sport horse FlyingCircus's Avatar
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    Default Rising Trot Diagonals

    Just curious, as I have only just learned of Germany rising differently to how we do in the UK...

    Does anywhere else do this? Why?

    I always thought you "rise and fall with the leg on the wall"...everywhere, haha.

  2. #2
    Veteran Cortez's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rising Trot Diagonals

    Nope, loads of other countries do it the opposite way (and some don't rise at all - rising trot was known as "le trot Anglais" in France for generations). Really doesn't matter which, actually.

  3. #3
    Veteran sandi_84's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rising Trot Diagonals

    Love the "rise and fall with the leg on the wall" rhyme But no idea about your question
    RIP Loki my wonderful boy 2006 - 2014 you were taken to soon, run free my lad xXx

    Writer of posts of saga like proportions! You have been warned!
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  4. #4
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    Default Re: Rising Trot Diagonals

    I always alternate my diagonals makes the horse more supple on both reins and helps prevent them having a weak side.

  5. #5
    Old nag FfionWinnie's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rising Trot Diagonals

    The point mainly if I remember correctly from PC days, to diagonals is to make sure you don't always rise on the same one (which I do, without fail, naturally!) isn't it? So I don't think it matters to the horse which one you are on, as long as you change it regularly. Having a system like we do when schooling, makes it easier to keep it equal I suppose.

    I had a neighbour who is a novice riding one of mine and I am sure she only rises on one diagonal as the mare is distinctly unbalanced when I ride her on the other one, she didn't used to be and improved the more I rode her instead of the novice. Not something I had really considered!
    Last edited by FfionWinnie; 09-07-13 at 11:09 PM.
    ˙ǝsɹoɥ ʎɯ uo ʞɔɐq ǝɯ ʇnd puɐ dn ǝɯ ʞɔıd ǝsɐǝld sıɥʇ pɐǝɹ uɐɔ noʎ ɟI


  6. #6
    Veteran alainax's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rising Trot Diagonals

    Interesting thread.

    Do you get marked down in the intro classes of dressage for being on the "wrong" diagonal?

  7. #7
    Veteran Cortez's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rising Trot Diagonals

    Quote Originally Posted by alainax View Post
    Interesting thread.

    Do you get marked down in the intro classes of dressage for being on the "wrong" diagonal?
    Yes you do!

  8. #8
    Sport horse blond1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rising Trot Diagonals

    I was taught that if you sit on the outside diagonal then it frees the inside hind to move forward and step under when you rise. Love the rhyme!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Rising Trot Diagonals

    I only alternate them at home schooling or out hacking never at a comp that would look just weird.

  10. #10
    Schoolmaster
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    Default Re: Rising Trot Diagonals

    It depends on whether the diagonals are named for a foreleg or hind leg......when I started learning from Americans I was quite confused for a little while until I realised the diagonal they were talking about was actually the one I wanted, but they called it the 'wrong' name as they referred to the hind leg, not the foreleg!! And the reason is that the weight of the rider should sit when the inside hind is on the ground.....

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