Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
  1. #1

    Default Turning out a laminitic on frosty grass

    my boy has had lami previously and after his last bout, my vet advised that he could not go out on frosty days (due to the sugar levels when the grass defrosts (normally sunny after a frost), which so far has been fine - it has been the odd day here and there....however now cos of this persistent very cold weather he has been stuck in his stable since last Wednesday with no end in sight

    Is anyone else in the same boat? Do you turn out anyway? Has anyone elses Vet advised similar?

    I am stuck between a rock and a hard place here as I do not want a rebout of lami and trying to give my horse a little bit of freedom....he would only be out for about 5 hours and gets hay....I have called my Vet to discuss and see what they say but i just wanted to see if anyone else was in the same boat as me....

  2. #2
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    North Somerset
    Posts
    4,637

    Default Re: Turning out a laminitic on frosty grass

    can you turn him out in a very small fenced off area?
    He will think he in the field but wont be able to eat too much grass.
    Kate

  3. #3

    Default Re: Turning out a laminitic on frosty grass

    I think the jury is out on frosty grass+sunny mornings and I wouldn't take the risk.

    I do turn out on frosty mornings just to muck out and he doesn't eat it anyway. Why don't you hang a haynet if you must turnout - most horses would choose hay over frozen grass anyday.

    (Whoops, just read you do give hay...)

    I turn out with hay if I have to.
    Love a lot, trust a few, but always paddle your own canoe...

    TOWING CLINIC
    = http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/forum...d.php?t=490195



  4. #4
    Veteran Black_Horse_White's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Staffordshire
    Posts
    2,229

    Default Re: Turning out a laminitic on frosty grass

    Mine had his first bout in the summer, I'm not risking it he stays in with the exception of an hour while I muck out. I'm paranoid as I've had to put him on wrapped hay because I can't soak my hay this weather and I worry about the dust too. I have had lots of problems with him this year and really don't want to take any chances.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Turning out a laminitic on frosty grass

    My horse has had lami and is also EPSM. So sugar and starch are off the menu.

    Sugar builds up in the leaves of grass during cold spells. It's not just about photosynthesis during the sunny spells but also that the sugar is not taken out of the leaves for storage elsewhere - so the leaves get a build up of sugar.

    So for my lami horse, because exercise is critical for EPSM I do turn her out, but for the morning only.

    We are not allowed to put hay in the field (which I would recommend if you can), so I feed her before turn out and let her eat a wedge of hay, so she isn't too hungry and therefore not tempted to stuff herself.

    Being barefoot we can monitor her every day and if there is any footiness she has to stay in for a day or two. This manages both the lami and the EPSM quite well (so far touch wood etc).

  6. #6

    Default Re: Turning out a laminitic on frosty grass

    its so hard to know what to do really - I also normally soak my hay as he is sensitive to dust but its just impossible in this weather...

    I just worry he is a big horse with slight athritis in his back leg and although I am doing something with him every night to get him moving, I worry that he isnt getting the interaction with other horses and when he does eventually go out he will go ballistic and I worry he will injure himself!

    god I hate having a horse that has had lami....it is the worst thing in the world!

    I have been so cautious and normally if its a few days here and there its not too bad but I have no idea when its going to warm up.......thanks for your thoughts - makes me feel a little better that I am not the only one with lami dilemmas!!

  7. #7
    Schoolmaster asmp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    662

    Default Re: Turning out a laminitic on frosty grass

    Can't you put a grazing mask on? Some are not too expensive and at least it would get the horse out for some exercise.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Turning out a laminitic on frosty grass

    he does wear a grazing muzzle normally but he would still be eating the frosty grass (albeit not as much) which my vet has said no to......but I will ask the question! I think if he did get any turnout it would literally be for 30mins or so whilst I mucked out with hay.....unfortunately I cant even turn him out in the arena with hay as its not fenced in on all sides.....

  9. #9

    Default Re: Turning out a laminitic on frosty grass

    I'm in a similar situation except I cant keep my girl in as she suffers colic from the stress of being stabled. She lives out 24/7 and touch wood for the last 2 years i havent had a problem. During the summer she is either on restricted grazing or muzzled and in the winter she gets given hay. I am quite lucky that where her winter field has been rested since last March and hasnt been topped, the grass is long and stalky like hay, so def no goodness in that.

    Pegasushorse Roxy, Pegasushorse Lucky, Pegasushorse Angel and Pug

  10. #10
    Old nag MrsMozart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Not where I should be...
    Posts
    32,217

    Default Re: Turning out a laminitic on frosty grass

    Speak to your vet, but when my laminitis prone pony was stabled at night, I made sure that he had a good feed before going out, plus there was hay in the field. Didn't have any problems. Now he's out twenty-four/seven we haven't had a problem either.

    From what I have read, the sugars will stay low down in the grass, so better longer grass than shorter if possible (that's what Little Lad is on).

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Find Horses For Sale