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  1. #1
    Sport horse
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    219

    Default Runaway horse & his bit...

    Hi,
    I have a 7yr old pure Connemara gelding and he is very brave in all aspects which is super after having such a nervy horse before but recently he has taken to getting a bit racy racy whilst out hacking with others (only once I actually ask for canter though) and the strength of him scared me a little bit. We ended up the other day leaving my friend and galloping across three fields and jumping the 4 and half foot electric fence at the bottom of the hill (I wanted an experienced jumper….). The usual turning in a tight circle etc etc trick did not work as he was just too strong for me so my instructor suggested a pelham.
    He has gone super in this – very respectful and doesn’t seem to be bothered about it at all (even though I’m not sure I’ve fitted the curb correctly –someone down the yard was on about a flat strap and the fact that I’ve got it on a drop noseband bridle…) so basically what I wanted to know is does anyone know a bit more about pelhams? Would I be able to do unaffiliated/affiliated show jumping with him wearing one?

    Also, does anyone know of a “bit advisor” in the Hertfordshire area? I know there are some people who will come out and try out different bits on your horse so that you can see what he goes best in, make sure it’s correctly fitted etc and then buy that bit at the end.

  2. #2
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    3,931

    Default Re: Runaway horse & his bit...

    I don't know of a bit advisor but is it worth ringing Martin Wilkinson and seeing if they know of anyone.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Runaway horse & his bit...

    This may help you...

    How to Use a Horse Pelham Bit


    People unfamiliar with riding horses may not realize how many different types of bits are available. Different types of bits and bridles are used for different types of horses and in various situations. A Pelham bit is not suggested for novice riders as it makes use of two reins, which may be difficult for beginner riders. If you feel you're ready to use a Pelham bit, here's how.


    Step1
    Place the Pelham bit into the horse's mouth. It should be placed lower than a snaffle bit, just touching the corners of the horse's mouth without too much pressure.

    Step2
    Adjust the curb chain so that it lies flatly against the groove of the horse's chin alongside the jaw. Adjust the curb chain so that it comes into use only when the curb ring is rotated 45 degrees.

    Step3
    Mount the horse. Hold one set of reins in one hand and the other set in the other hand. The reins for the curb control raising and lowering the horse's head with pressure on his jaw and the reins for the bit, or the snaffle reins, control how high or low he holds his head while you're riding.

    Step4
    Start by controlling the horse with the snaffle reins at first, especially if she has been trained with a snaffle bit. Allow slack in the curb rein and apply more tension to the snaffle rein.

    Step5
    Work between applying tension and easing off the two reins until you get the horse's head positioned exactly the way you want it. Then start to take pressure off the snaffle rein and give more tension to the curb rein until you're guiding the horse using the curb rein more than the snaffle.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Runaway horse & his bit...

    Sorry, I think the above posting is very confusing - and doesn't answer the question. Never use a drop, flash or grackle with a pelham, kimblewick or English gag. These bits give pressure on the poll and the jaw and the drop, flash and grackle restrict the horse's head/jaw further.

    Lots of people use a pelham with roundings between the two rings of the bit so they can use one rein. I prefer to use two reins - and it is worth learning to do so as many horses go better with two reins - but you can try roundings and one rein if you want. (And I suspect you do.) There should be a strap of some sort through the ring on the curb chain to help keep the curb chain in place. There are different kinds of straps; I used to use a rounded leather one.

    When using two reins, you don't have one set of reins in one hand and the other in the other hand. When you mount, you should hold the top (snaffle) rein and not the bottom. When you are on top, you hold the top rein as normal and the curb rein between your second and third fingers or fourth and fifth fingers.

    I am not an expert but did used to run a bit bank. Also tried a number of bits with my very strong cob (now dead) - settled on snaffle or Dr Bristol in the school, pelham or English gag out hacking or sponsored rides, pelham for shows.

    If you want to talk this through, I'm on 020 7435 6762.

    Marcia

  5. #5
    Sport horse
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    219

    Default Re: Runaway horse & his bit...

    Ok so a definite change in noseband is needed before i ride again then as i don't want to make my very genuine but sometimes cheeky horse feel like I’m stopping him move at all and clamping down his head!
    I ride with a lozenge/barrel style snaffle Myler for schooling as the versatility of the bit movement really impresses me and he has stopped “leaning” on the bit since I have started using it and the Pelham is just for hacking where I anticipate a canter/gallop or jumping/sponsored rides. I do use roundings as I didn’t get on with the two reins for jumping and I use a different bit for schooling so lazily decided it wasn’t worth persevering.
    I will buy a strap then as currently it’s just the hooks keeping the curb chain on and I may very well ring you (if you really don’t mind) if I come across problems with it!

    Do you know if there’s restrictions on using a Pelham for showjumping?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,655

    Default Re: Runaway horse & his bit...

    You can practically use any bit you want BSJA - as long as it isn't 'cruel', or contain any sharp bits, made of twine etc.

  7. #7
    Old nag
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    10,238

    Default Re: Runaway horse & his bit...

    If that doesn't work, I'd definitely try a waterford as my sister's pony leans quite a lot and this is super at stopping that without making her back off. I use a copper roller on my horse out hacking as he is prone to enjoying a good gallop, lol, and that works amazingly well...

    Pelhams are allowed for all SJ, and XC.
    http://teamreggiediaries.wordpress.com
    The diary of two ex-racers as they attempt to become normal horses. Please note, normal is a relative term

  8. #8
    Sport horse
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    219

    Default Re: Runaway horse & his bit...

    Fantastic! Thanks all! x

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