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View Full Version : Straw on lorries getting wet What happens to it!



charliesarmy
14-09-10, 11:42 AM
Whilst stuck on the M-way in horrendous rain conditions..two lorries with trailers passed me on the other carriageway both stacked high with the big (heston) straw bales they were not tarped..so obviously getting soaked,what happens to it surely its ruined??

See how bored I was in that traffic!!!:eek:

applecart14
14-09-10, 11:45 AM
Whilst stuck on the M-way in horrendous rain conditions..two lorries with trailers passed me on the other carriageway both stacked high with the big (heston) straw bales they were not tarped..so obviously getting soaked,what happens to it surely its ruined??

See how bored I was in that traffic!!!:eek:

I think it would be only the outer bales that were ruined, and if they are going to be used for cattle I'm sure the farmer wouldn't be too concerned if the straw gets eventual mould spores living in it, after all his livestock presumably won't be around long enough to see the effects of COPD as they will be burgers and steaks and the like!:(

CBFan
14-09-10, 11:46 AM
I very much doubt it was soaked through... but it could get used for sheep or cattle... it isn't necessarily denstined for precious horses! ;)

HelsB
14-09-10, 11:50 AM
It could well end up in horse feed, so not only will it have been sprayed with pesticides, herbicides, it will have deisel fumes from the road.

I imagine that the rain will be the least of the 'nasties' that will end up in the feed

charliesarmy
14-09-10, 11:57 AM
It could well end up in horse feed, so not only will it have been sprayed with pesticides, herbicides, it will have deisel fumes from the road.

I imagine that the rain will be the least of the 'nasties' that will end up in the feed

haha maybe thats what they are doing "washing it" :D

christi
14-09-10, 11:59 AM
I have also seen many many round bales of straw lying about in fields soaking wet.

i often wonder why hay and straw suppliers dont use truck with curtains !

3DE
14-09-10, 12:02 PM
They are rolled that tight they are pretty much impenetrable to the rain from above. The ones left in the fields tend to spoil from the bottom up rather than the other way round.

Fairynuff
14-09-10, 12:03 PM
in big bales, the rain cant penetrate into the bales due to its density and the formation of of fibres so only the outside will be wet.

zoeshiloh
14-09-10, 12:07 PM
A lot of the big bale straw you see stacked up outside exposed to the elements, and transported about, goes for biofuel, so it doesn't really matter that it gets wet.

As others have said, farmers are less fussy about damp straw being used for cows etc - they don't go in and fluff it up like we do, they just throw slabs in and it gets eaten/trodden in, so a bit of damp/mould does not seem to matter. Also, as sheep and cows have different digestive systems to horses, they are less prone to mould causing digestive problems.

rosie fronfelen
14-09-10, 12:11 PM
I think it would be only the outer bales that were ruined, and if they are going to be used for cattle I'm sure the farmer wouldn't be too concerned if the straw gets eventual mould spores living in it, after all his livestock presumably won't be around long enough to see the effects of COPD as they will be burgers and steaks and the like!:(
ha, you presume wrong!!

applecart14
15-09-10, 07:47 AM
ha, you presume wrong!!

Really. Surely they won't be round long enough to worry about though??? I'm not a vegetarian by the way, I love my lamb chops and steaks.

I wasn't trying to be offensive to farmers by the way, surely that's the way of the world.

criso
15-09-10, 08:15 AM
Being on a livery yard that is attached to a farm we have bales that get wet either from the bottom or top. The inside ones are generally fine.

Depending we will use the dry half or ask them to swap the whole bale for another in which case I think it goes off to the cows.

Applecart14 Lambs and some calves will go off to be meat but some cows are used for milk and the breeding stock will be used for several years.

Slinkyunicorn
15-09-10, 08:21 AM
Some of the straw goes to power stations to be burnt - not all is used for animals.

RunToEarth
15-09-10, 08:24 AM
I think it would be only the outer bales that were ruined, and if they are going to be used for cattle I'm sure the farmer wouldn't be too concerned if the straw gets eventual mould spores living in it, after all his livestock presumably won't be around long enough to see the effects of COPD as they will be burgers and steaks and the like!:(

Very stupid comment, pretty good example of how ignorant horse people can be.
Our straw for our dairy farm has been brought 70miles from my OH's arable farm. It has been rained on during the journey.
Mouldy straw is a result of it lying unbaled in rows in a field to get wet, and baled afterwards- straw bales will take many months stood out to the elements before it moulds- that is why it makes such a good temp wall for beet pads.
Once straw has been baled it will withstand a fair amount of rain. Farmers store it under cover to preserve it, and so it isn't wet for livestock.
Asides from the obvious welfare regulations in place on farms, farmers generally like to have a good standard of health among herds.

Cuffey
15-09-10, 08:27 AM
I have also seen many many round bales of straw lying about in fields soaking wet.

i often wonder why hay and straw suppliers dont use truck with curtains !

I am looking out at over 100 big round bales made in good weather but still sitting on the field seems a waste and risk to farmers health as well when they open bales with spores on the outside

navaho
15-09-10, 08:42 AM
Applecart14 Lambs and some calves will go off to be meat but some cows are used for milk and the breeding stock will be used for several years.

Ditto this, the farm where i keep some of my horses had one of their cows die of old age, i think she was late teens early 20's, she had bred them a calf every year as well!

sammiea
15-09-10, 09:22 AM
All my father in laws straw (less the few hundred little bales i have) is sold to a local contractor who comes in bales it and then transports it to power stations as fuel... its becoming big business in my area there are vast amounts stack up in fields awaiting collection near me... we often see many stack fires to!!

RunToEarth
15-09-10, 10:11 AM
All my father in laws straw (less the few hundred little bales i have) is sold to a local contractor who comes in bales it and then transports it to power stations as fuel... its becoming big business in my area there are vast amounts stack up in fields awaiting collection near me... we often see many stack fires to!!
That is why we get ours from OHs now- we used to buy from Doncaster, the fields backed onto a very rough estate and we lost a lot of bales to fire- pretty pointless thing to do, surely?

sammiea
15-09-10, 10:23 AM
You would think it was pointless but obviously the "runaway thugs" think its a "good game" last year it was a stack near the bottom of in laws track down to the farm, lane was closed for 3days due to fire, smoke then road damage from the fire grrr glad to see that this year there is no stack in this location!!

rosie fronfelen
15-09-10, 10:29 AM
Really. Surely they won't be round long enough to worry about though??? I'm not a vegetarian by the way, I love my lamb chops and steaks.

I wasn't trying to be offensive to farmers by the way, surely that's the way of the world.

our beef cattle are not fed straw but silage,but more importantly some of our " girls" areover 10 years old, they are still throwing excellent calves with no trouble, so i did find your comment a touch offensive and naive- sorry!

PucciNPoni
15-09-10, 10:49 AM
I'll tell ya what happens - or at least what happened to me the other day!!!


I was following a straw wagon for a few miles and it was windy and rainy....and when I got out of the car and looked at it.....it resembled a straw bed!!! the whole front of my car was completely plastered with bits of straw! LOL

applecart14
16-09-10, 08:50 PM
our beef cattle are not fed straw but silage,but more importantly some of our " girls" areover 10 years old, they are still throwing excellent calves with no trouble, so i did find your comment a touch offensive and naive- sorry!

Really??????? How strange.:rolleyes:

rosie fronfelen
16-09-10, 08:53 PM
Really??????? How strange.:rolleyes:

why,i find your comments ignorant and insulting to farmers, thats how strange!

applecart14
16-09-10, 08:55 PM
Very stupid comment, pretty good example of how ignorant horse people can be.
Our straw for our dairy farm has been brought 70miles from my OH's arable farm. It has been rained on during the journey.
Mouldy straw is a result of it lying unbaled in rows in a field to get wet, and baled afterwards- straw bales will take many months stood out to the elements before it moulds- that is why it makes such a good temp wall for beet pads.
Once straw has been baled it will withstand a fair amount of rain. Farmers store it under cover to preserve it, and so it isn't wet for livestock.
Asides from the obvious welfare regulations in place on farms, farmers generally like to have a good standard of health among herds.

As for you RTE, well you are just down right rude. I wasn't intended to be a stupid comment nor was I being 'ignorant' but I did think it was an accurate assumption. I may not have been 'brought up on a farm' but I am aware that certain animals are kept and not used for meat. My gosh some people like to hurl the nasty comments don't they?? I don't quite think it was necessary for your comments to be quite so horrid.

applecart14
16-09-10, 08:56 PM
why,i find your comments ignorant and insulting to farmers, thats how strange!

For goodness sakes grow up:p

By the time the mould spores have grown enough to cause upper respiratory problems in livestock they will be deceased. What on earth is rude about that comment??? It never even crossed my mind that it would be construed as 'insulting to farmers'. I was just making what I thought was a valid contribution to the debate.

Why do people insist on making more of things on this forum?????

rosie fronfelen
16-09-10, 08:57 PM
For goodness sakes grow up:p

ha, how old do you want me to be--lol!

SusieT
16-09-10, 09:01 PM
ac14-I am curious as to why you are offended you have been corrected? It is actually not a huge proportion that ' aren't around long enough' as you have the bulls and cows to breed to beef stock, then of course dairy stock are kept on past 2 years or so until they are no longer productive enough.
Nevermind that unhealthy cows from respiratory disease from being near mouldy straw will not have a good feed gain ratio so will not be profitable to farmers.

rosie fronfelen
16-09-10, 09:05 PM
For goodness sakes grow up:p

By the time the mould spores have grown enough to cause upper respiratory problems in livestock they will be deceased. What on earth is rude about that comment??? It never even crossed my mind that it would be construed as 'insulting to farmers'. I was just making what I thought was a valid contribution to the debate.

Why do people insist on making more of things on this forum?????

your initial post was insulting, no 2 ways about it, we do not feed our cattle straw anyway.

applecart14
16-09-10, 09:12 PM
your initial post was insulting, no 2 ways about it, we do not feed our cattle straw anyway.

Okay, okay I stand to be corrected.

On behalf of everyone whom I have offended I apologise unreserverably. I do recognise that I am not God, nor am I the font of all knowledge. I do get things wrong from time to time even though I don't think I should be shot down in flames for it.

Now am I forgiven???? Please????:(

rosie fronfelen
16-09-10, 09:16 PM
Okay, okay I stand to be corrected.

On behalf of everyone whom I have offended I apologise unreserverably. I do recognise that I am not God, nor am I the font of all knowledge. I do get things wrong from time to time even though I don't think I should be shot down in flames for it.

Now am I forgiven???? Please????:(

yep fine, no probs- i dont think you would like to chew steaks off our girls unless you have extra strong teeth! xx

RunToEarth
16-09-10, 09:16 PM
As for you RTE, well you are just down right rude. I wasn't intended to be a stupid comment nor was I being 'ignorant' but I did think it was an accurate assumption. I may not have been 'brought up on a farm' but I am aware that certain animals are kept and not used for meat. My gosh some people like to hurl the nasty comments don't they?? I don't quite think it was necessary for your comments to be quite so horrid.

Ah yes, of course I am rude, because I have insulted you
But perhaps you could open your mind and perhaps engage brain before you write your thoughts on an open forum, if you are not expecting to be show down in flames.

"and if they are going to be used for cattle I'm sure the farmer wouldn't be too concerned if the straw gets eventual mould spores living in it, after all his livestock presumably won't be around long enough to see the effects of COPD as they will be burgers and steaks and the like"

Welfare regulations enforced by DEFRA are actually pretty water tight if you have any larger herd than a couple of cows.
Farmers generally like to keep a good bill of health in livestock farms, I am not debating you are not aware many animals are not used for meat, I was challenging you for saying "I'm sure the farmer wouldn't be too concerned the traw gets eventual mould spores living it" because it is a pretty stupid, unfounded statement, and I would like to know how you consider it an accurate assumption.
It is basically like someone who has no knowledge of horses calling you cruel for not having a rug on your horse when it is raining in the summer, and perhaps if you did understand the point of view of a farmer, you would realise quite how ridiculous your comments are.
If you are aware that many animals are kept and not sold for meat, and you are aware that most farmers give a **** about their animals, then why would you make such a slack comment?
I'm not rude, I'm firing back at a pretty hurtful comment.

applecart14
16-09-10, 09:26 PM
Ah yes, of course I am rude, because I have insulted you
But perhaps you could open your mind and perhaps engage brain before you write your thoughts on an open forum, if you are not expecting to be show down in flames.

"and if they are going to be used for cattle I'm sure the farmer wouldn't be too concerned if the straw gets eventual mould spores living in it, after all his livestock presumably won't be around long enough to see the effects of COPD as they will be burgers and steaks and the like"

Welfare regulations enforced by DEFRA are actually pretty water tight if you have any larger herd than a couple of cows.
Farmers generally like to keep a good bill of health in livestock farms, I am not debating you are not aware many animals are not used for meat, I was challenging you for saying "I'm sure the farmer wouldn't be too concerned the traw gets eventual mould spores living it" because it is a pretty stupid, unfounded statement, and I would like to know how you consider it an accurate assumption.
It is basically like someone who has no knowledge of horses calling you cruel for not having a rug on your horse when it is raining in the summer, and perhaps if you did understand the point of view of a farmer, you would realise quite how ridiculous your comments are.
If you are aware that many animals are kept and not sold for meat, and you are aware that most farmers give a **** about their animals, then why would you make such a slack comment?
I'm not rude, I'm firing back at a pretty hurtful comment.

Ok if you are not mature/sensible/reasonable or fair enough to accept my apology then that's fine. I can't be bothered to argue with you. You know nothing about me and are not interested in my view point other than to argue the toss continually. I am going to bed. I care about animals as much as the next person. I rescue ex bat hens and I do voluntary work for the blue cross, as well as other charity work. As I say you know nothing. I have obviously touched a VERY raw nerve. If the other poster accepted my apology in good faith then what makes you so special???? No don't bother answering that.

pastie2
16-09-10, 09:32 PM
Well said RTE. Having farmed for many years, the welfare of stock is of paramount importance. If you want a good price at market your stock has to be in the best condition that you can get it. This simply doesnt happen with bad husbundry and poor quality bedding and forage. Straw can be kept outside for a number of days due to the fact that it is so tightly packed. You cannot equate farming with horses.

SusieT
16-09-10, 09:39 PM
ac14 its unlikely rte had read you apology as it was 4 mins before her post..

bonny
16-09-10, 09:54 PM
No need to apologise as far a I can see - it's Rosie and RTE who are being rude not you !
We've all seen straw left out in fields getting wet and stored outside, alot of farmers simply don't have the storage to keep it inside. The farm I live on are certainly not at all fussy about the standard of hay and straw that they use - cost is the only thing that matters and I would never use any of it for horses......obviously horse owners are fussier about what they use for feed or bedding and to argue otherwise is wrong .....

pastie2
16-09-10, 10:23 PM
No need to apologise as far a I can see - it's Rosie and RTE who are being rude not you !
We've all seen straw left out in fields getting wet and stored outside, alot of farmers simply don't have the storage to keep it inside. The farm I live on are certainly not at all fussy about the standard of hay and straw that they use - cost is the only thing that matters and I would never use any of it for horses......obviously horse owners are fussier about what they use for feed or bedding and to argue otherwise is wrong .....

For goodness sake, as I said in a previous post you really cannot equiate farming with horse care. Cattle are kept as cattle should be kept, we dont ride cattle, we dont keep cattle like horses because if we did no one would be able to afford to eat meat. Cattle have differant requirements to horses, they have a completely differant stomach to equines. They are kept as a herd inside in the winter, they are bedded each day, but within a few hours, because they are bovines, their bed is a mess. It has to be scraped out, so straw that might be a bit damp round the edges really doesnt make a damn of differance. Yes cost does matter to a farmer, they are in business, not enjoying a hobby. To get good prices for your stock they have to be in prime condition. Without farmers you wouldnt have this countryside to ride in.

bonny
16-09-10, 10:25 PM
Pastie - was I talking to you ?
I think we all know that, it's hardly rocket science .....

pastie2
16-09-10, 10:28 PM
Pastie - was I talking to you ?
I think we all know that, it's hardly rocket science .....

Lol!!! Silly.

bonny
16-09-10, 10:33 PM
You are that !!!

pastie2
16-09-10, 10:37 PM
You are that !!!

Silly girl. Re read your posts to see who is in need of educating.

bonny
16-09-10, 10:41 PM
Meaning ?
Surely all you did was agree with me and miss the point of what I was saying ?

pastie2
16-09-10, 10:47 PM
Meaning ?
Surely all you did was agree with me and miss the point of what I was saying ?

No bonny, I was saying that farm animals are kept as farm animals. Yes they have requirements, not quite the same as horses. If you read your post previous to mine you will see why I have argued with you. I dont really want to fall out with you. xx

bonny
16-09-10, 10:54 PM
And there was me saying farm animals were kept as what ? Don't call me names unless you can back it up with something .......just no need.

pastie2
16-09-10, 10:59 PM
And there was me saying farm animals were kept as what ? Don't call me names unless you can back it up with something .......just no need.

I give up. Good night bonny.

bonny
16-09-10, 11:04 PM
I accept your well disguised apology !

PucciNPoni
17-09-10, 05:27 AM
Oh FFS, what a bunch of children. How is it that only on HHO can a reather tame subject get folk arguing?!

RunToEarth
17-09-10, 06:53 AM
Sorry applecart, I honestly hadn't read your appology before I posted.
Bonny you come off very badly in this thread, ignorance is bliss, eh?

bonny
17-09-10, 07:28 AM
Ignorant of what ? What happens on the farm where I live ?

rosie fronfelen
17-09-10, 09:49 AM
No need to apologise as far a I can see - it's Rosie and RTE who are being rude not you !
We've all seen straw left out in fields getting wet and stored outside, alot of farmers simply don't have the storage to keep it inside. The farm I live on are certainly not at all fussy about the standard of hay and straw that they use - cost is the only thing that matters and I would never use any of it for horses......obviously horse owners are fussier about what they use for feed or bedding and to argue otherwise is wrong .....

EXCUSE ME Bonny, this was between Applecart and myself, no need to sick your nose in, she and i have it sorted so go away.

bonny
17-09-10, 09:59 AM
You can always be trusted to come up with a sensible reply !
It's called a forum, I can have an opinion the same as anyone else. I thought you were being needlessly rude, Applecart wasn't. I think you are wrong, but heyho we are all different. And no, I'm not going to go away ........

rosie fronfelen
17-09-10, 10:10 AM
You can always be trusted to come up with a sensible reply !
It's called a forum, I can have an opinion the same as anyone else. I thought you were being needlessly rude, Applecart wasn't. I think you are wrong, but heyho we are all different. And no, I'm not going to go away ........

why carry onwith this stupid vendetta? just to keep it running or what- we have come to a conclusion so why cant you, or nothing else to brighten up your day? ah well hey ho--

bonny
17-09-10, 10:17 AM
I think you'll find it was you who came on this morning and posted a nasty reply, not me !
Pot, kettle etc .......

rosie fronfelen
17-09-10, 10:19 AM
oh whatever, keep it going, im bored now with silly retorts so am off- enjoy your day.