Running multiple horses at a meeting requires organisation. Seven horses from my yard went to our local meeting at Kingston Blount on Saturday and, with head jockey Joe out of action, we had to find replacements. Luckily Gina Andrews and Archie Wright filled in.

Having good relationships with jockeys means a trainer can call on them when needed, and the jockeys already know how the trainer likes those horses to be ridden.

The night before a busy day, my wife Lawney and I create a database stating each horse’s name; time of race; anything it wears, such as tongue tie, blinkers, boots; and who leads it up. Every staff member gets a copy.

Horses are matched according to their races and they travel there and back together. Three lads stay at home to take care of the yard, enabling the racing staff to concentrate solely on their horses at home, checking for injuries, bandaging and rugging up.

Sunday was an easier day with only one runner, Hunters Lodge, at Godstone. The horse belongs to Gareth Henderson, who is also the jockey. Owner-riders require more input as I walk the course and talk tactics with him — such as where to place the horse in the field, when to push on and how to tackle each fence and section of the course. Tactics are important.

Ref: Horse & Hound; 10 March 2016