Nineteen-year-old Emma Harlow from Sheffield was this year’s winner of thetalent spotting final, held at the Talland School of Equitation, Glos .

Emma beat five other finalists who had all been selected through regionalcourses held last autumn.

In the final ride-off she had to ride PammyHutton¨s grand prix ride Amanti, and admits her experience over the past fewmonths stood her in good stead.

She said: “I have been able to ride horses of all sizes, type and disciplineand not all of them good. Although I was stillnervous, I was able toappreciate the occasion and enjoy my ride on Amanti.”

The Worshipful Company of Saddlers donated a new bridle to the winner andsponsors the British Dressage Supporters Club awarded training grants givingEmma £800.

Emma now intends to go to university in the autumn to readaccountancy although she hopes to carry on riding her own horses which shetrains with Chris White.

Elder Klatzko went through to the final ride-off and gained a £400 traininggrant as the runner-up.

Elder, from Kent, begins her mock A’ level exams this week and after school hopes to work with horses in her gap year.

She was impressed by the standard of horses to ride at Talland.

“After today I think I would like to come to work and trainhere – they have such lovely horses.”

The other four finalists: Amy Knight from Leics, Katie Bisson fromJersey, Richard Baldwin from Solihull and Rachael Rodgers Beesley fromLancs, were all given training grants of £200 each.

The competition has a unique formula and the final is judged purely onability to ride several unfamiliar horses over the course of the day.

The candidates also have to give a verbal assessment of the horses to thejudges, on this occasion, trainer Paul Fielder and List One judge MaureenNewall.

It was however the last time the talent spotting final will be held atTalland, where it has been held since its inception 18 years ago.

The competition now moves to Addington and due to the increase of numbers itwill be the last time this formula is used.

Pammy Hutton, who runs Talland said: “This is the only competition whereriders have a chance without owning a horse and it has been for that reasonwe have supported it.”