One of the pioneers of para dressage and a former British Horse Society (BHS) chief examiner, Jane Goldsmith, died on Friday (1 June).

The 71-year-old was a highly respected trainer in all disciplines, a fellow of the BHS and an FEI para steward, who acted in many cases as an expert witness.

But it was her work in the development of para dressage that set Jane apart.

She has coached riders, including Lee Pearson, to paralympic standard and was a five-star para judge.

Last year, she was presented with the Queen’s Award for Equestrianism for her outstanding service.

British Dressage chief executive Amanda Bond said: “Jane’s contribution to our sport, both here in Great Britain and throughout the world has been phenomenal.

“As one of the pioneers of Para Dressage sport, we owe her a huge debt of gratitude for her dedication. She will be fondly remembered by so many for her wisdom, her generosity and her strength of character.

“We have lost a great coach and a dear friend. Our prayers are with [her husband] John and her family.”

On hearing the news of her death, para riders paid tribute to Jane on Facebook.

“This weekend’s competition will be for Jane Goldsmith, one of the founders of Para Dressage, without whom I would not be where I am today,” wrote Sophie Christiansen.

And Sophie Wells added: “Very sad to hear Jane Goldsmith passed away last night. A sad loss to the world of para dressage, thank you for all you did and the opportunities you gave Jane xxx.”