Fourteen-year-old Nominee Redwood, “Teddy”, was bought by Adrienne Barnett from Dullingham, near Newmarket, as a six-year-old. The only Shell Gas Freestyle champion, he is ridden by Jill Day. Adrienne gave Jill a half-share in Teddy as a 40th birthday present.

Teddy, bred in Holland by the sire Zebulon, competes at grand prix and, in 1998, gained fifth place at the national championships.

How did you come to own Nominee Redwood?

As a five-year-old, Teddy used to come to our yard at Hastingwood with his original owner for lessons with David Hunt. We thought he would be an ideal horse for Jill and ourselves to do a bit with and offered first refusal if he ever came up for sale.

How was he named?

He was already called something Redwood and Teddy as a stable name. We added the Nominee prefix as he is sponsored by my husband’s company, Nominee Assurance.

How did you get into dressage?

Michael and I took up riding when our children were youngas we thought it an ideal family pastime. We went on to have our own ponies and horses and took up lessons that led us to dressage.

How did you choose your rider? Jill started teaching me when I had a horse called Rudi Pooh. Rudi was going well at home, but was difficult at competitions, and I asked Jill to compete him to get his confidence. I got him back six years later after two unexpected seasons at grand prix.

We enjoyed the involvement so much that we decided to buy another more talented horse.

What has been your best moment so far?

There have been a few. The first time we were asked to compete abroad was a big thrill. But it didn¨t go according to plan. Teddy got his highest percentage to date at our second international competition at Beek. The nationals in 1998 was also a very good show for us.

And the worst?

At Nunspeet in 1998. Teddy was working in so well ¨ the most relaxed and best ever at a big show that we really thought this was the moment. But as soon as he changed arenas, he froze and lost it. Although we know his nerves have always been a problem, it was very disappointing.

Your ambition?

We have learnt with horses to take one day at a time, but we¨d like to see Teddy improve on his percentage score this year. Eventually we would love to see our home-bred youngster by Catherston Humbug go on to grand prix.

Greatest complaint about the sport?

From a layman¨s point of view, at times we become confused by the outcome of judges’ marks. We think we know the difference between a mediocre test and what we believe to be a good test, yet inevitably they end up with the same percentage, which can be frustrating.

Best aspect of the sport?

Seeing the improvement of British riders during recent years.Favourite venue?

Anywhere that Teddy goes well – but Catherston whether he goes well or not.

What do you do in your other life?

More horses, deal with everybody else’s problemsand enjoy following the careers of our racehorses. In between, we strive to earn enough money to pay for all this fun.