When you take our equine insurance you can choose to have your tack included on your policy, but you need to check the small print to ensure you comply with the levels of security required or risk having a theft claim rejected.

Jo Sowley, senior equine underwriter at NFU Mutual, says good tackroom security is essential.

“Some insurance policies do insist on certain locks, so check your policy wording,” she says. “When insuring your tack, check the sum insured is adequate. Some policies pay the value of the tack at the time of the loss, but others pay the full replacement cost. However, this can only be paid if the sum insured accurately reflects the cost of replacing equipment with new.”

David Buckton of SEIB advises checking your saddlery and tack policy carefully.

“Some insurers have very detailed and specific security requirements, and theft claims will not be paid if those security arrangements are not in force,” he says. “At SEIB, we require tack not in use to be kept in a locked building, for example at home, or in a locked tackroom at the yard.”

Martyn Harris recommends high padbolts (sliding bolts that are lockable by a padlock) or high security locks.

“A good padlock on a cheap padbolt is no barrier,” he says. “Also, if the door hinge screws are visible, replace some or all with security or clutch head screws that cannot be unscrewed.”

Finally, consider a tack safe; Equine Security has one with security features usually found on gun cabinets.

This article formed part of an insurance special in Horse & Hound (24 July 2008)